Research Topic

Stress, Mood, and Fatigue: Tackling “Invisible” Obstacles in Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery

About this Research Topic

Stroke affects around 17 million people world-wide per year and is one of the leading causes of death and disability. Over the last decade, the acute treatment of stroke has improved substantially, resulting in an ever-increasing number of stroke survivors. Stroke survivors undergo early and/or late rehabilitation programs as a part of routine stroke care.
However, not all stroke survivors demonstrate sufficient recovery to enable participation in meaningful life roles and are living with potentially lifelong consequences. Up to one-third of stroke survivors experience ongoing comorbidities such as psychological stress and depression, low mood, and fatigue. These comorbidities are often missed and neglected because unlike physical disabilities, they are ‘invisible’. These invisible comorbidities can negatively impact on neural repair processes and brain functions and impede stroke recovery and rehabilitation.

Despite solid evidences that majority of stroke survivors experience high and unremitting levels of stress, fatigue, depression or anxiety, there are no specific evidence-based rehabilitation programs that have been designed to empower stroke survivors to deal with them. For instance, stroke survivors are not informed about how stress can negatively impact on their recovery, nor do they receive any formal evidence-based stress management strategies.
Stress management strategies, individual level of resilience, self-efficacy and use of active coping approaches may help stroke survivors to fight against these ‘invisible’ disabilities. In this Research Topic, we are seeking articles that characterize these invisible obstacles to stroke recovery and/or provide therapeutic or rehabilitation strategies to deal with these problems.

We welcome submissions of manuscripts (Original Research, Systematic Review, Review, Hypothesis and Theory, Perspective, Clinical Trial, Brief Research Report, Opinion, Study Protocol) focused on the following topics in humans or animals:
• Stress (perceived or biological): determinants and its effect on stroke outcomes, recovery, and quality of life; stress management interventions
• Depression, anxiety, and low mood: determinants and their effect on stroke outcomes, recovery, and quality of life; interventions
• Post-stroke fatigue: determinants and its effect on stroke outcomes, recovery, and quality of life; fatigue management interventions
• Role of resiliency and coping strategies in dealing against stress, fatigue, depression, and anxiety


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Stroke affects around 17 million people world-wide per year and is one of the leading causes of death and disability. Over the last decade, the acute treatment of stroke has improved substantially, resulting in an ever-increasing number of stroke survivors. Stroke survivors undergo early and/or late rehabilitation programs as a part of routine stroke care.
However, not all stroke survivors demonstrate sufficient recovery to enable participation in meaningful life roles and are living with potentially lifelong consequences. Up to one-third of stroke survivors experience ongoing comorbidities such as psychological stress and depression, low mood, and fatigue. These comorbidities are often missed and neglected because unlike physical disabilities, they are ‘invisible’. These invisible comorbidities can negatively impact on neural repair processes and brain functions and impede stroke recovery and rehabilitation.

Despite solid evidences that majority of stroke survivors experience high and unremitting levels of stress, fatigue, depression or anxiety, there are no specific evidence-based rehabilitation programs that have been designed to empower stroke survivors to deal with them. For instance, stroke survivors are not informed about how stress can negatively impact on their recovery, nor do they receive any formal evidence-based stress management strategies.
Stress management strategies, individual level of resilience, self-efficacy and use of active coping approaches may help stroke survivors to fight against these ‘invisible’ disabilities. In this Research Topic, we are seeking articles that characterize these invisible obstacles to stroke recovery and/or provide therapeutic or rehabilitation strategies to deal with these problems.

We welcome submissions of manuscripts (Original Research, Systematic Review, Review, Hypothesis and Theory, Perspective, Clinical Trial, Brief Research Report, Opinion, Study Protocol) focused on the following topics in humans or animals:
• Stress (perceived or biological): determinants and its effect on stroke outcomes, recovery, and quality of life; stress management interventions
• Depression, anxiety, and low mood: determinants and their effect on stroke outcomes, recovery, and quality of life; interventions
• Post-stroke fatigue: determinants and its effect on stroke outcomes, recovery, and quality of life; fatigue management interventions
• Role of resiliency and coping strategies in dealing against stress, fatigue, depression, and anxiety


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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