Research Topic

The Role of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition in Smokers: Towards Understanding the Potential Effects in Reinforcing Nicotine Dependence, Withdrawal Symptoms and Mood

About this Research Topic

Tobacco smoking remains one of the most damaging addictions known, causing over eight million deaths each year world-wide. The main addictive component of tobacco smoke is nicotine, but evidence suggests that the addictive effects of smoking are more than the effects of nicotine alone. Contributing factors range from societal influences, cigarette engineering and marketing, and other smoke components having pharmacological effects. The major candidates to fill this latter role are the monoamine oxidase inhibitors in tobacco smoke.

Despite ongoing research into the effect of monoamine oxidase inhibition on tobacco dependence and a wide array of suggestive results encouraging further investigation, no clear proof has emerged to show that tobacco monoamine oxidase inhibitors affect addiction to nicotine. It is also unclear whether monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers has any generalized or specific therapeutic benefit within mental health conditions. Since monoamine oxidase inhibitors are a major drug target, this possibility remains open.

In this Research Topic we seek to bring together the latest information and synthesis of current understanding in this area. What are the neurological consequences of monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers? Which components of tobacco smoke act to lower monoamine oxidase activity in smokers and by what mechanism? Does this monoamine oxidase inhibition enhance the addictive response to nicotine? Does monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers have behavioral consequences, both in addiction and in modulation of mood more generally? Are the psychoactive components of tobacco smoke a positive, or a negative influence on mental health and neurological conditions, and do they have pharmacological potential?

We are calling for papers which pertain to the addictiveness of smoking and to the complex neurophysiological effects of smoking. We are particularly interested in the role of non-nicotinic components of tobacco smoke, with emphasis on (but not limited to) monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers. Reviews or mini-reviews of topic areas will be welcome. Negative results may be accepted, if that result helps advance our understanding of the topic as a whole.

Our overall aim is to add to, and consolidate, current understanding of the pharmacological effects of monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers with a view to identifying knowledge gaps and pointing to the key questions currently requiring answers.

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P. Truman is a member of End Smoking New Zealand, a small charitable trust set up to advocate for harm reduction approaches to smoking cessation. She has been a member of the New Zealand Ministry of Health Technical Advisory Committee on e-cigarette regulation.

During the years 2005 to 2011, Dr. Murugesan worked on the development of a harm reduction product, later sold to Phillip Morris International (PMI). Dr. Murugesan received his final share of the sale proceeds (Inventor's share) from 2011 to 2015. Dr. Murugesan has neither been involved in any PMI activities nor received any benefits from any tobacco or vaping companies (including PMI) since June 2015.


Keywords: Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition, Tobacco Dependence, Nicotine, Withdrawal Symptoms, Anxiety, Depression


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Tobacco smoking remains one of the most damaging addictions known, causing over eight million deaths each year world-wide. The main addictive component of tobacco smoke is nicotine, but evidence suggests that the addictive effects of smoking are more than the effects of nicotine alone. Contributing factors range from societal influences, cigarette engineering and marketing, and other smoke components having pharmacological effects. The major candidates to fill this latter role are the monoamine oxidase inhibitors in tobacco smoke.

Despite ongoing research into the effect of monoamine oxidase inhibition on tobacco dependence and a wide array of suggestive results encouraging further investigation, no clear proof has emerged to show that tobacco monoamine oxidase inhibitors affect addiction to nicotine. It is also unclear whether monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers has any generalized or specific therapeutic benefit within mental health conditions. Since monoamine oxidase inhibitors are a major drug target, this possibility remains open.

In this Research Topic we seek to bring together the latest information and synthesis of current understanding in this area. What are the neurological consequences of monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers? Which components of tobacco smoke act to lower monoamine oxidase activity in smokers and by what mechanism? Does this monoamine oxidase inhibition enhance the addictive response to nicotine? Does monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers have behavioral consequences, both in addiction and in modulation of mood more generally? Are the psychoactive components of tobacco smoke a positive, or a negative influence on mental health and neurological conditions, and do they have pharmacological potential?

We are calling for papers which pertain to the addictiveness of smoking and to the complex neurophysiological effects of smoking. We are particularly interested in the role of non-nicotinic components of tobacco smoke, with emphasis on (but not limited to) monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers. Reviews or mini-reviews of topic areas will be welcome. Negative results may be accepted, if that result helps advance our understanding of the topic as a whole.

Our overall aim is to add to, and consolidate, current understanding of the pharmacological effects of monoamine oxidase inhibition in smokers with a view to identifying knowledge gaps and pointing to the key questions currently requiring answers.

-
P. Truman is a member of End Smoking New Zealand, a small charitable trust set up to advocate for harm reduction approaches to smoking cessation. She has been a member of the New Zealand Ministry of Health Technical Advisory Committee on e-cigarette regulation.

During the years 2005 to 2011, Dr. Murugesan worked on the development of a harm reduction product, later sold to Phillip Morris International (PMI). Dr. Murugesan received his final share of the sale proceeds (Inventor's share) from 2011 to 2015. Dr. Murugesan has neither been involved in any PMI activities nor received any benefits from any tobacco or vaping companies (including PMI) since June 2015.


Keywords: Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition, Tobacco Dependence, Nicotine, Withdrawal Symptoms, Anxiety, Depression


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

03 September 2021 Abstract
01 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 September 2021 Abstract
01 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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