Research Topic

Mucosal Microbiota Specific T and B cells: From Homeostasis to Diseases

About this Research Topic

Over the last twenty years, research on mammal’s microbiota (gut, lung or skin microbiota) has shown that these microbial ecosystems, composed of several micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses), maintain close relationships with the immune system of their hosts.

Numerous findings have shown that the microorganisms of the microbiota, through the metabolites they produce and also through microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), can activate innate immune responses. However, the microorganisms in our body are also a source of antigens and peptides that can be specifically recognized by the receptors of the effectors of adaptive immunity: T cell receptor (TCR) and B cell receptors (BCR). These antigens thus participate in the induction of microbiota specific lymphocyte populations and several lines of evidence suggest their role in normal and pathological immune responses. Several lines of evidence point to cross-reactivity between antigens from gut microorganisms and pathological antigens. LTs or LBs induced by gut antigens could thus participate in the control or exacerbation of local or systemic diseases.

This Research Topic aims to provide an overview of the current advances in the understanding the biological functions of the immune effector cells (α/β T cells and B cells) specific from antigens provided by the various microorganisms composing the gut mucosal microbiota, with a particular focus on, their phenotypes, the mechanisms of their induction, their role in diseases and the impact of microbiota alterations on their homeostasis.

In this Research Topic, we welcome submissions of Original Research, Review, Opinion and Method articles that address, but are not limited to, the following subtopics:
- Identification of gut mucosal microbiota antigens specifically recognized by α/β T or B cell antigen receptors.
- Cross reactivity between autoimmune and gut mucosal microbiota antigens.
- Molecular and cellular mechanisms for gut mucosal microbiota antigen specific T and B cells induction.
- The impact of gut mucosal microbiota modifications (antibiotics, probiotic treatments, fecal transplantation interventions) in the induction and function of microbial antigen-specific lymphocytes.


Keywords: gut; T cells; B cells; antigenic specificity; mucosal associated microbiota; microbe-associated molecular patterns; MAMPs; homeostasis; disease


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Over the last twenty years, research on mammal’s microbiota (gut, lung or skin microbiota) has shown that these microbial ecosystems, composed of several micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses), maintain close relationships with the immune system of their hosts.

Numerous findings have shown that the microorganisms of the microbiota, through the metabolites they produce and also through microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), can activate innate immune responses. However, the microorganisms in our body are also a source of antigens and peptides that can be specifically recognized by the receptors of the effectors of adaptive immunity: T cell receptor (TCR) and B cell receptors (BCR). These antigens thus participate in the induction of microbiota specific lymphocyte populations and several lines of evidence suggest their role in normal and pathological immune responses. Several lines of evidence point to cross-reactivity between antigens from gut microorganisms and pathological antigens. LTs or LBs induced by gut antigens could thus participate in the control or exacerbation of local or systemic diseases.

This Research Topic aims to provide an overview of the current advances in the understanding the biological functions of the immune effector cells (α/β T cells and B cells) specific from antigens provided by the various microorganisms composing the gut mucosal microbiota, with a particular focus on, their phenotypes, the mechanisms of their induction, their role in diseases and the impact of microbiota alterations on their homeostasis.

In this Research Topic, we welcome submissions of Original Research, Review, Opinion and Method articles that address, but are not limited to, the following subtopics:
- Identification of gut mucosal microbiota antigens specifically recognized by α/β T or B cell antigen receptors.
- Cross reactivity between autoimmune and gut mucosal microbiota antigens.
- Molecular and cellular mechanisms for gut mucosal microbiota antigen specific T and B cells induction.
- The impact of gut mucosal microbiota modifications (antibiotics, probiotic treatments, fecal transplantation interventions) in the induction and function of microbial antigen-specific lymphocytes.


Keywords: gut; T cells; B cells; antigenic specificity; mucosal associated microbiota; microbe-associated molecular patterns; MAMPs; homeostasis; disease


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2021 Abstract
04 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2021 Abstract
04 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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