Research Topic

Neural Basis of Reading Acquisition and Reading Disability

About this Research Topic

Reading is an essential skill for children to master. It is not only necessary for success in school, but also important for maintaining a high quality of life in our increasingly literate society. Changes in technology have altered reading formats and increased the range of reading situations, placing even more pressure on foundational reading skills. Acquiring these foundational reading skills involves establishing knowledge of orthographic, phonological, and semantic information that the brain stores about printed words, supported by knowledge about spoken language and conceptual knowledge. Such knowledge seems simple and natural to the literate adult, many children in the world encounter severe reading difficulties and fail to develop a high level of reading ability Some of these children become diagnosed as dyslexic. Progress in research on reading acquisition and dyslexia has occurred over the last half a century, demonstrating the importance of phonological knowledge, e.g. awareness of meaningless speech segments, as universal, cross-language factor predicting and affecting reading acquisition and developmental dyslexia. More recently, differences among writing systems and languages have been found to influence aspects of reading development. Important findings about reading acquisition and dyslexia have been reported from neuroimaging, cognitive, and genetic perspectives.

This article collection in Frontiers in Neuroscience aims to advance our knowledge of the neurobiology of reading ability and disability across languages and writing systems. Research on the molecular/cellular/circuit basis underlying reading acquisition (vision/hearing/multisensory integration) and studies using animal models are also most welcome.

This research topic will include articles that can be of any type (e.g., original research, modeling, methods, review, meta-analysis, or perspective).


Keywords: Reading Acquisition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Reading is an essential skill for children to master. It is not only necessary for success in school, but also important for maintaining a high quality of life in our increasingly literate society. Changes in technology have altered reading formats and increased the range of reading situations, placing even more pressure on foundational reading skills. Acquiring these foundational reading skills involves establishing knowledge of orthographic, phonological, and semantic information that the brain stores about printed words, supported by knowledge about spoken language and conceptual knowledge. Such knowledge seems simple and natural to the literate adult, many children in the world encounter severe reading difficulties and fail to develop a high level of reading ability Some of these children become diagnosed as dyslexic. Progress in research on reading acquisition and dyslexia has occurred over the last half a century, demonstrating the importance of phonological knowledge, e.g. awareness of meaningless speech segments, as universal, cross-language factor predicting and affecting reading acquisition and developmental dyslexia. More recently, differences among writing systems and languages have been found to influence aspects of reading development. Important findings about reading acquisition and dyslexia have been reported from neuroimaging, cognitive, and genetic perspectives.

This article collection in Frontiers in Neuroscience aims to advance our knowledge of the neurobiology of reading ability and disability across languages and writing systems. Research on the molecular/cellular/circuit basis underlying reading acquisition (vision/hearing/multisensory integration) and studies using animal models are also most welcome.

This research topic will include articles that can be of any type (e.g., original research, modeling, methods, review, meta-analysis, or perspective).


Keywords: Reading Acquisition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

17 November 2021 Abstract
17 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

17 November 2021 Abstract
17 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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