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About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 20 June 2022
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 20 July 2022

Repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS) describes a technique of non-invasive stimulation of nerves, muscles, spinal roots or even the autonomic nervous system: a coil positioned on the skin elicits high-frequency repetition of magnetic impulses. rPMS likely influences the excitability of the ...

Repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS) describes a technique of non-invasive stimulation of nerves, muscles, spinal roots or even the autonomic nervous system: a coil positioned on the skin elicits high-frequency repetition of magnetic impulses. rPMS likely influences the excitability of the responsive structures beneath the coil and this leads to changes in neuronal function or neuroplasticity at the basis of any learning or rehabilitation. rPMS can be administrated at frequencies higher than frequencies possible in other techniques of non-invasive peripheral stimulation, it is relatively painless and can easily be implemented in clinical settings.

Research on the development of commercially available magnetic nerve and brain stimulators and the advent of repetitive magnetic stimulation in the 1990s contributed to the increase of studies using rPMS, especially in the two last decades.Despite the positive impact denoted by these studies in chronic pain and sensorimotor disorders, despite the very limited side-effects reported and its ease of use and administration, rPMS protocols in research and clinical practice have received less attention than magnetic brain stimulation.

This Research Topic aims to further contribute to the knowledge of how rPMS should be administrated to influence neuroplastic or adaptive mechanisms in neurological disorders to improve the function or how it could be used and implemented in clinical research or practice to exploit these mechanisms of plasticity in order to improve the gains in neurorehabilitation.

Research areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

- Methodology of stimulation (protocols, intensity, duration etc.).

- Neuroplasticity induced by rPMS.

- The potential of rPMS to be used as a tool for better diagnosing or treating patients with neurological disorders.

- The mechanisms of action of rPMS.

- The clinical improvements induced by rPMS in neurological conditions (including the quality of life).

- The validation of new methods or protocols.

- The use of rPMS in clinical settings for the rehabilitation of patients with various neurological conditions
(including studies to improve usability or implementation).

We welcome translational and clinical studies including Original Research, Systematic Review, Methods, Review, Mini Review, Hypothesis and Theory, Perspective, Clinical Trial and Opinion.

Keywords: pain management, neurological disorder, stroke therapy, muscular disorder, stroke, muscle spasticity, muscle hypertonia, pain, cerebral palsy, migraine, ALS, radiculopathy, pelvic floor, bladder dysfunction, spinal cord injury, palliative care, paresis, tinnitus, muscle atrophy, reflex, magnetic stimulation, rPMS, MEP, CMAP, diaphragm stimulation


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