Research Topic

Multimodal Behavior from Animals to Bio-Inspired Robots

About this Research Topic

Animals exhibit multimodal behavior, which means that they can behave in different motion patterns, such as crawling, running, jumping, hunting, escaping, etc., by efficiently exploiting their body morphology and neural control system. These behaviors are simple and natural to animals and enable them to survive in nature.

Various attempts, including using hybrid structure systems, neural control, and embodied intelligence, have been made to mimic such impressive multimodal behaviors for robots. However, robots still fail in comparison to their biological counterparts in terms of adaptability, flexibility, and versatility, because this attempt involves the synthesis of structure, control, planning, and optimization. The multimodal concept, which has previously been realized in vehicle engineering and electrical engineering, will greatly improve the agility and intelligence of bio-inspired robots’ behavioral control, while also posing new challenges. Therefore, further research and new discussions related to the multimodal concept for robot behavior still need to be conducted.

Bio-inspired robots have been used to perform tasks in a variety of fields thanks to recent technological advancements. From a theoretical and engineering standpoint, it is preferable to create a robot with different behaviors to adapt to these different conditions rather than using special robots in specific situations. Multimodal behavior control appears to be the most effective way to contribute to this field. It can benefit from animals’ locomotion and increase the robot’s universality.

Aiming at this Research Topic, some key points should be noted. The design of mechanical structure for multimodal behavior should be taken into consideration (e.g., a combination of legged robot and wheeled robot, a hexapod robot that can transform into a quadruped or biped robot). Abundant sensory systems provide perception for the bio-inspired robot, which gives the possibility of automatic multimodal behavior control. Theoretical foundations are also welcome. Since biology is the source of the bio-inspired robot, we welcome research into mutual inspirations and enhancements between biology and engineering.

Topics of interest include but not limited to:

­- Bio-inspired robots

­- Mechanical design for multimodal behavior

­- Sensor-driven behavior and locomotion control

­- Multimodal sensory integration for multimodal behavior

­- Theoretical foundations of multimodal behavior control

­- Bio-inspired approaches for multimodal behavior

­- Applications of multimodal behavior

­- New trends in the multimodal control framework


Keywords: multimodal behavior, bio-inspired robot, locomotion control, embodied intelligence, multimodal sensory integration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Animals exhibit multimodal behavior, which means that they can behave in different motion patterns, such as crawling, running, jumping, hunting, escaping, etc., by efficiently exploiting their body morphology and neural control system. These behaviors are simple and natural to animals and enable them to survive in nature.

Various attempts, including using hybrid structure systems, neural control, and embodied intelligence, have been made to mimic such impressive multimodal behaviors for robots. However, robots still fail in comparison to their biological counterparts in terms of adaptability, flexibility, and versatility, because this attempt involves the synthesis of structure, control, planning, and optimization. The multimodal concept, which has previously been realized in vehicle engineering and electrical engineering, will greatly improve the agility and intelligence of bio-inspired robots’ behavioral control, while also posing new challenges. Therefore, further research and new discussions related to the multimodal concept for robot behavior still need to be conducted.

Bio-inspired robots have been used to perform tasks in a variety of fields thanks to recent technological advancements. From a theoretical and engineering standpoint, it is preferable to create a robot with different behaviors to adapt to these different conditions rather than using special robots in specific situations. Multimodal behavior control appears to be the most effective way to contribute to this field. It can benefit from animals’ locomotion and increase the robot’s universality.

Aiming at this Research Topic, some key points should be noted. The design of mechanical structure for multimodal behavior should be taken into consideration (e.g., a combination of legged robot and wheeled robot, a hexapod robot that can transform into a quadruped or biped robot). Abundant sensory systems provide perception for the bio-inspired robot, which gives the possibility of automatic multimodal behavior control. Theoretical foundations are also welcome. Since biology is the source of the bio-inspired robot, we welcome research into mutual inspirations and enhancements between biology and engineering.

Topics of interest include but not limited to:

­- Bio-inspired robots

­- Mechanical design for multimodal behavior

­- Sensor-driven behavior and locomotion control

­- Multimodal sensory integration for multimodal behavior

­- Theoretical foundations of multimodal behavior control

­- Bio-inspired approaches for multimodal behavior

­- Applications of multimodal behavior

­- New trends in the multimodal control framework


Keywords: multimodal behavior, bio-inspired robot, locomotion control, embodied intelligence, multimodal sensory integration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

13 February 2022 Abstract
14 April 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

13 February 2022 Abstract
14 April 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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