Research Topic

Disclosure Within HIV-Affected Families

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HIV disclosure of a parent's and a child's illness is challenging to HIV-positive parents and healthcare professionals. Many countries with high HIV prevalence do not have HIV disclosure guidelines for a parent's and/or a child's illness. HIV-positive parents and healthcare professionals have called for ...

HIV disclosure of a parent's and a child's illness is challenging to HIV-positive parents and healthcare professionals. Many countries with high HIV prevalence do not have HIV disclosure guidelines for a parent's and/or a child's illness. HIV-positive parents and healthcare professionals have called for guidelines to be created to ease the challenges associated with the HIV disclosure process. Regional cultural practices affect HIV disclosure; therefore the start-to-end process of HIV disclosure within HIV-affected families across different cultures and regions is not well understood. To increase the body of knowledge available on HIV disclosure, primary research, review, perspective, mini-review, hypothesis and theory, and opinion manuscripts are welcome within the following areas:
- Following diagnosis of adult index persons, the process of HIV testing and disclosure among their spouses and children.
- HIV disclosure following initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART).
- Cultural issues associated with HIV disclosure.
- HIV stigma and disclosure issues.
- HIV disclosure, non-disclosure, and criminalization.
- HIV disclosure and intimate partner violence.
- HIV disclosure and safer sex initiatives.
- HIV disclosure in the LGBTQ community.
- HIV disclosure, ART adherence, and retention in care issues.
- HIV testing and disclosure among serodiscordant couples and their children.
- How HIV disclosure is approached to HIV-positive, HIV-negative, and untested children within HIV-affected families.
- Perceptions of HIV disclosure from HIV-positive, HIV-negative, and untested children within HIV-affected families.
- Effects of HIV disclosure on HIV-positive, HIV-negative, and untested children within HIV-affected families.
- Long term/persistent negative effects of HIV disclosure on HIV-positive parents and their children; and the services/programs/interventions available to help them overcome these negative effects.
- Testing of existing or new models/theories of HIV disclosure of a parent's and/or a child's illness.
- Primary research papers proposing HIV disclosure guidelines.
- HIV disclosure perspectives of perinatally infected children diagnosed early in life versus those diagnosed in their teenage years.
- Perspectives from adults who acquired their infection perinatally who now need to disclose to their own children.
- Healthcare professionals perspectives on best practices and/or their role in HIV disclosure of a parent's and/or a child's illness.
- Systematic reviews of HIV disclosure research.
- Other closely related topics in HIV disclosure among HIV-affected family members are also highly welcomed.


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