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Manuscript Submission Deadline 16 April 2023

Perhaps the last of the great mysteries facing neuroanatomy concerns the anatomical bases of cognition (from Latin cognoscere “to get to know, recognize”): the brain’s ability to think, perceive, plan, analyze, and remember. While exciting new findings have emerged in the 20th century, with the enormous development of cognitive psychology, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging technologies, we have not yet fully mastered these mysteries. These higher-level functions of the brain encompass attention, thought, language, learning, perception, memory, decision-making, and motor planning, as well as the influence of emotion and motivation upon cognition. Of course, cognition is not uniquely human. All these cognitive components have their anatomical correlates, that is, there is some correspondence, at a given level of description, between the neuroanatomical and the cognitive architectures. Scientific investigation of these phenomena is inherently interdisciplinary, drawing strength from fields as diverse as neuroimaging, neurophysiology, cognitive psychology, and computational theory.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather contributions from specialists of a wide array of disciplines enriching our understanding of the anatomical underpinnings of cognition.

We welcome authors to submit articles focused on the anatomical bases of cognitive processes in both humans and animals, including, but not limited to the following:

- Brain imaging (structural, functional, tractography, connectivity), in normal subjects or in cognitive disorders
- Animal models of basic mechanisms and their applications to human mental disorders
- Molecular bases of cognitive processes
- Development, maturation, and normal aging of neural networks involved in cognitive processes
- Event-related potentials
- Neural bases of cognition from an evolutionary perspective
- Comparative cognition
- Lesion studies (neuropsychology)
- Applied neuroanatomy (cognitive impairment)
- Neuropathology
- Artificial Intelligence-machine learning applied to neuroimaging
- Brain-computer interface-Neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

It is interesting to use our cognitive processes to investigate these same processes: a recursive and circular procedure that returns to itself, but, with each scientific contribution, it will be multiplied, allowing us to unveil a little more the mysteries that remain to be solved.

Keywords: Cognition, Anatomy, Neural, Language, Attention, Neuroimaging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Perhaps the last of the great mysteries facing neuroanatomy concerns the anatomical bases of cognition (from Latin cognoscere “to get to know, recognize”): the brain’s ability to think, perceive, plan, analyze, and remember. While exciting new findings have emerged in the 20th century, with the enormous development of cognitive psychology, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging technologies, we have not yet fully mastered these mysteries. These higher-level functions of the brain encompass attention, thought, language, learning, perception, memory, decision-making, and motor planning, as well as the influence of emotion and motivation upon cognition. Of course, cognition is not uniquely human. All these cognitive components have their anatomical correlates, that is, there is some correspondence, at a given level of description, between the neuroanatomical and the cognitive architectures. Scientific investigation of these phenomena is inherently interdisciplinary, drawing strength from fields as diverse as neuroimaging, neurophysiology, cognitive psychology, and computational theory.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather contributions from specialists of a wide array of disciplines enriching our understanding of the anatomical underpinnings of cognition.

We welcome authors to submit articles focused on the anatomical bases of cognitive processes in both humans and animals, including, but not limited to the following:

- Brain imaging (structural, functional, tractography, connectivity), in normal subjects or in cognitive disorders
- Animal models of basic mechanisms and their applications to human mental disorders
- Molecular bases of cognitive processes
- Development, maturation, and normal aging of neural networks involved in cognitive processes
- Event-related potentials
- Neural bases of cognition from an evolutionary perspective
- Comparative cognition
- Lesion studies (neuropsychology)
- Applied neuroanatomy (cognitive impairment)
- Neuropathology
- Artificial Intelligence-machine learning applied to neuroimaging
- Brain-computer interface-Neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

It is interesting to use our cognitive processes to investigate these same processes: a recursive and circular procedure that returns to itself, but, with each scientific contribution, it will be multiplied, allowing us to unveil a little more the mysteries that remain to be solved.

Keywords: Cognition, Anatomy, Neural, Language, Attention, Neuroimaging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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