Research Topic

Omics and systems approaches in grapevine fruit composition to understand responses to environmental factors and agronomical practices

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Foreword: Contributors, please note that papers only relating to the species Vitis vinifera will be considered in this Research Topic. Other submissions may be considered in relevant Frontiers in Plant Science Specialty ...

Foreword: Contributors, please note that papers only relating to the species Vitis vinifera will be considered in this Research Topic. Other submissions may be considered in relevant Frontiers in Plant Science Specialty Sections.

Fruits play a significant role in the human diet as sources of vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and a wide range of molecules relevant to health-promotion and disease prevention. In the case of grapevines, one of the most important fruit crops grown in the world, characterizing genes that regulate the accumulation of metabolites throughout fruit ripening is key for improving quality and production traits, and for predicting plant behavior in response to the environment. In addition, grapevine production face challenging scenarios driven by climate change, including increasing atmospheric CO2, terrestrial radiation and earth surface temperature, and declining water availability, all of which can be detrimental to plant physiology and consequently to fruits.

The sequencing of the Vitis vinifera genome has given rise to a new era characterized by large-scale data requiring complex computational analysis. Several transcriptomic and metabolomic studies have been performed in this species, providing insights into gene networks that control fruit development and composition. However, few studies have assessed the impact of climate and agronomical practices on fruits on a large-scale, and fewer still have focused on the proteomic or epigenetic level.

This Research Topic is centered on studies that use ‘omics’ strategies to understand how environmental factors and agronomical practices influence grape fruit development and composition. This is a novel topic for Frontiers in Plant Science that specifically addresses how human activity (e.g. microclimate modification, fertilization, irrigation, and post-harvest management) affect fruit physiology. All types of articles (original research, methods, opinions and reviews) are welcome. We encourage submissions of studies addressing epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic (including lipidomics), or ionomic techniques, as well as bioinformatics-oriented studies (e.g. gene expression networks). Studies on vegetative organs in their relation to fruit development and approaches in fruit-derived cell cultures will also be considered. Since the composition and quality of fruit is modulated at various biological levels, we especially encourage the submission of studies that integrate two or more ‘omics’ platforms, and those applying systems biology approaches to address important questions for the developmental programming of grapevine fruits.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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