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About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 20 March 2023

Glutamatergic neurons and circuits play a significant role in the maintenance of neural networks and synaptic plasticity. As the main excitatory synapses in the brain, glutamatergic neurons and their synapses are major cellular cites to encode short and long-term memory representation, maintenance and the ...

Glutamatergic neurons and circuits play a significant role in the maintenance of neural networks and synaptic plasticity. As the main excitatory synapses in the brain, glutamatergic neurons and their synapses are major cellular cites to encode short and long-term memory representation, maintenance and the survival of synaptic connections. Therefore, they contribute to development of various brain disorders. In addition, glutamatergic neurons show various species-specific differences in human compared to rodents.

There exist two forms of long-term plasticity that occur at glutamatergic synapses: long-term depression (LTD), the weakening of specific sets of synapses and long-term potentiation (LTP), the increase in synaptic response to stimuli. The attenuated inhibited or enhanced efficacy effect that of glutamatergic synapses play in these forms of long-term plasticity has an effect on stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. Accumulating data on experiments using human resected brain tissue shows that glutamatergic neurons are moderately but significantly different in human compared to rat or mouse, the two most common experimental animal used in biomedical research.

In this Research Topic, Frontiers in Synaptic Neuroscience is looking to address key aspects of glutamate-mediated neurotransmission in order to promote discussion around this topic and to facilitate knowledge dissemination. Specifically, the inhibited or enhanced effects that glutamatergic synaptic plasticity has on hippocampal, neocortical and cerebellar synaptic operation and excitability, as well as wider effects this may have on the formation of various brain disorders.

We particularly welcome submission of Original Research, Review, Methods, and Perspective articles around, but not limited to, the following sub-topics:

- Glutamatergic circuits in human compared to rodents or other experimental animals
- Long-term depression and long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission
- Role and effect of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the formation of various brain disorders, including, obesity, anxiety, depression
- Investigation of the effects specific glutamate receptors play in synaptic plasticity, and novel research into their role
- Mechanisms of synaptic plasticity that mediate integration of new cells into existing circuitry
- Novel methods to study glutamate-mediated neurotransmission

Keywords: Glutamate, Synaptic Plasticity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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