Research Topic

Evolution of Signaling in Plant Symbioses

About this Research Topic

This Research Topic explores signaling processes that promote the interaction between plants and microbial symbionts. We focus on the integration of signal transduction pathways in an evolutionary framework.

Plants interact constantly with microbes in their environment. Some interactions have evolved into symbiosis, in which the life cycles of the plant and microbe are deeply intertwined. For the establishment of a symbiosis both partners have to recognize each other, i.e., signal molecules from both partners have to bind specific receptors to activate signal transduction chains. Further steps in the development of the interaction – e.g., organogenesis, stable internal accommodation of a microsymbiont in plant cells and the control of nutrient exchange – also require reciprocal signaling processes and continuous feedback between the partners. These may include the adaptation of signal transduction chains that evolved for other purposes; for instance it is well known that LysM receptor kinases are involved in plant-pathogen and plant-symbiotic interactions, also that the evolution of root nodule symbioses involved the recruitment of a pre-existing signal transduction pathway already in place for the ancestral association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

This Research Topic welcomes manuscripts studying all aspects of signaling processes in symbiotic interactions of plants with an evolutionary viewpoint. In particular, research examining the evolutionary links between different plant endosymbioses or evolutionary origins of different signaling modules or components are welcomed. Examples include the evolution of receptors or other parts of signal transduction chains, the evolution of signal molecules that coordinate mutual recognition, alteration of development and nutrient exchange, as well as the evolution of transcriptional networks. We particularly welcome studies focusing on:
- Evolution of signaling in root nodule symbioses (legume-rhizobia and actinorhizal symbioses)
- Evolution of signaling in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses
- Evolution of signaling in ectomycorrhizal symbioses
- Evolution of signaling in cyanobacterial symbioses

We welcome Mini-Reviews, Opinions, Perspectives, Hypothesis & Theory, and Original Research articles.


Keywords: Evolution, Symbiosis, Biotic Interaction, rhizobia, Frankia, Glomeromycota, nodules, actinorhiza, mycorrhiza, arbuscular, Nostoc, Biological Nitrogen Fixation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

This Research Topic explores signaling processes that promote the interaction between plants and microbial symbionts. We focus on the integration of signal transduction pathways in an evolutionary framework.

Plants interact constantly with microbes in their environment. Some interactions have evolved into symbiosis, in which the life cycles of the plant and microbe are deeply intertwined. For the establishment of a symbiosis both partners have to recognize each other, i.e., signal molecules from both partners have to bind specific receptors to activate signal transduction chains. Further steps in the development of the interaction – e.g., organogenesis, stable internal accommodation of a microsymbiont in plant cells and the control of nutrient exchange – also require reciprocal signaling processes and continuous feedback between the partners. These may include the adaptation of signal transduction chains that evolved for other purposes; for instance it is well known that LysM receptor kinases are involved in plant-pathogen and plant-symbiotic interactions, also that the evolution of root nodule symbioses involved the recruitment of a pre-existing signal transduction pathway already in place for the ancestral association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

This Research Topic welcomes manuscripts studying all aspects of signaling processes in symbiotic interactions of plants with an evolutionary viewpoint. In particular, research examining the evolutionary links between different plant endosymbioses or evolutionary origins of different signaling modules or components are welcomed. Examples include the evolution of receptors or other parts of signal transduction chains, the evolution of signal molecules that coordinate mutual recognition, alteration of development and nutrient exchange, as well as the evolution of transcriptional networks. We particularly welcome studies focusing on:
- Evolution of signaling in root nodule symbioses (legume-rhizobia and actinorhizal symbioses)
- Evolution of signaling in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses
- Evolution of signaling in ectomycorrhizal symbioses
- Evolution of signaling in cyanobacterial symbioses

We welcome Mini-Reviews, Opinions, Perspectives, Hypothesis & Theory, and Original Research articles.


Keywords: Evolution, Symbiosis, Biotic Interaction, rhizobia, Frankia, Glomeromycota, nodules, actinorhiza, mycorrhiza, arbuscular, Nostoc, Biological Nitrogen Fixation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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