Research Topic

Mast Cell and Basophil-Driven Diseases

About this Research Topic

For many years, Mast cells (MC) and Basophils (Ba) were considered only as effector cells in IgE-associated immune responses, contributing to asthma and other allergic diseases and to host resistance to parasites. Although both cell types share many similarities, they also diverge in developmental features and in diverse functions. Both cell types express a high affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (Fc epsilon RI) on their surface and the receptor cross-linking by IgE-Ag leads to the release of a variety of preformed, lipid and cytokine mediators. However, new functions for MC and Ba as potential immunoregulatory cells have recently been uncovered, in IgE-mediated acquired immunity, and also in diseases in which binding to IgE is not involved (e.g. IgE-independent urticaria and IgE-independent anaphylaxis cancer). Associations between these cell types and various significant pathologies is dependent on a plethora of receptors/ligands and stored and released molecules that enable the establishment of a strict interplay of MC and Ba with the microenvironment. Any changes in the tissue can be detected and amplified, but modification in the regulation of MC and Ba activity can be reflected in a pathology. For example, Mast cell or Basophil activation syndrome is often found in patients with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and in subset groups of patients with common variable immunodeficiency and Lyme disease.

The aim of this Research Topic is to give an overview of Mast cell/Basophil driven diseases spanning from urticaria to mastocytosis. We invite the submission of Review and Perspective articles within the scope of two main sub-themes:

1. Studies that unmask the regulatory, and effector, roles of MC and Ba in diseases such as urticaria, type I allergies etc, considering the recent findings on the biology of these cells.
2. Studies on mastocytosis and models of this disease, different therapeutic approaches for mastocytosis and the translation of data produced in animal or cellular models of this disease to the human system.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

For many years, Mast cells (MC) and Basophils (Ba) were considered only as effector cells in IgE-associated immune responses, contributing to asthma and other allergic diseases and to host resistance to parasites. Although both cell types share many similarities, they also diverge in developmental features and in diverse functions. Both cell types express a high affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (Fc epsilon RI) on their surface and the receptor cross-linking by IgE-Ag leads to the release of a variety of preformed, lipid and cytokine mediators. However, new functions for MC and Ba as potential immunoregulatory cells have recently been uncovered, in IgE-mediated acquired immunity, and also in diseases in which binding to IgE is not involved (e.g. IgE-independent urticaria and IgE-independent anaphylaxis cancer). Associations between these cell types and various significant pathologies is dependent on a plethora of receptors/ligands and stored and released molecules that enable the establishment of a strict interplay of MC and Ba with the microenvironment. Any changes in the tissue can be detected and amplified, but modification in the regulation of MC and Ba activity can be reflected in a pathology. For example, Mast cell or Basophil activation syndrome is often found in patients with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and in subset groups of patients with common variable immunodeficiency and Lyme disease.

The aim of this Research Topic is to give an overview of Mast cell/Basophil driven diseases spanning from urticaria to mastocytosis. We invite the submission of Review and Perspective articles within the scope of two main sub-themes:

1. Studies that unmask the regulatory, and effector, roles of MC and Ba in diseases such as urticaria, type I allergies etc, considering the recent findings on the biology of these cells.
2. Studies on mastocytosis and models of this disease, different therapeutic approaches for mastocytosis and the translation of data produced in animal or cellular models of this disease to the human system.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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