Research Topic

Electrocardiographic Imaging

About this Research Topic

Electrical activity in the myocardium coordinates the contraction of the heart, and its knowledge could lead to a better understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac diseases. This electrical activity generates an electromagnetic field that propagates outside the heart and reaches the human torso surface, where it can be easily measured. Classical electrocardiography aims to interpret the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) to determine cardiac activity and support the diagnosis of cardiac pathologies such as arrhythmias, altered activations, and ischemia. More recently, a higher number of leads is used to reconstruct a more detailed quantitative description of the electrical activity in the heart by solving the so-called inverse problem of electrocardiography. This technique is known as ECG imaging.

Today, clinical applications of ECG imaging are showing promising results in guiding a variety of electrophysiological interventions such as catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. However, in order to promote the adoption of ECG imaging in the routine clinical practice, further research is required regarding more accurate mathematical methods, further scientific validation under different preclinical scenarios and a more extensive clinical validation. This research topic is an open proposal to share new methods, evaluation metrics, experimental validations, clinical applications, emerging ideas and any further contributions related to the advancement of ECG imaging.


Keywords: ECG imaging, inverse problem, electrocardiography


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Electrical activity in the myocardium coordinates the contraction of the heart, and its knowledge could lead to a better understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac diseases. This electrical activity generates an electromagnetic field that propagates outside the heart and reaches the human torso surface, where it can be easily measured. Classical electrocardiography aims to interpret the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) to determine cardiac activity and support the diagnosis of cardiac pathologies such as arrhythmias, altered activations, and ischemia. More recently, a higher number of leads is used to reconstruct a more detailed quantitative description of the electrical activity in the heart by solving the so-called inverse problem of electrocardiography. This technique is known as ECG imaging.

Today, clinical applications of ECG imaging are showing promising results in guiding a variety of electrophysiological interventions such as catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. However, in order to promote the adoption of ECG imaging in the routine clinical practice, further research is required regarding more accurate mathematical methods, further scientific validation under different preclinical scenarios and a more extensive clinical validation. This research topic is an open proposal to share new methods, evaluation metrics, experimental validations, clinical applications, emerging ideas and any further contributions related to the advancement of ECG imaging.


Keywords: ECG imaging, inverse problem, electrocardiography


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

21 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

21 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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