Research Topic

GABAergic Control of Amygdala: Regulation by Stress and Relevance to Neuropsychiatric Diseases

About this Research Topic

To promote survival, our brains need to appropriately process the ever-changing events in our living environments. Many of these events, are more or less stressful. Amygdala, a nuclei complex located deep inside the temporal lobe, has emerged as a central hub of stress processing in our brain. One prominent feature which distinguishes amygdala from many of its neighboring regions such as hippocampus and cortex is that the inhibitory tone in this region is particularly high under resting state. Such a highly inhibitory tone, which is primarily sustained by GABAergic interneuronal network, is thought to be prerequisite for our brain to filter most neutral events and prevent us to generate inappropriate emotional and behavioral response to these events. However, when we are exposed to a stressful state, the GABAergic inhibition in amygdala will be quickly removed, which, as a consequence, allows the swift transfer of the stressful information from amygdala to the downstream nuclei in the hypothalamus, middle brain and brainstem to elicit appropriate behavioral and emotional response. As such, dynamic GABAergic regulation in amygdala has constituted one of the kernel neurobiological bases of stress processing in brain. Of note is that several extreme states of stress such as earthquake and wars may cause desregulation of GABAergic inhibition in amygdala, which is generally manifested as persistent loss of GABAergic control of amygdala. Such disinhibition is known to essentially contribute to the development of a spectrum of stress-related neuropsychological diseases such anxiety disorders and depression. Many of the pharmacological therapeutics available for treatment of mental illness have their anxiolytic and/or antidepressant effects partially through augmenting GABAergic inhibition in amygdala.

In this Research Topic, we aim to collect original research articles as well as reviews and perspective articles to 1) provide novel basic and clinical evidence regarding the molecular, synaptic and circuit mechanisms underlying the GABAergic control of amygdala and its regulation/desregulation by stress; 2) find new approaches targeting GABAergic regulation in amygdala to prevent and treat stress-related neuropsychiatric illness.


Keywords: Amygdala, GABA, stress, inhibition, neuropsychiatric illness


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

To promote survival, our brains need to appropriately process the ever-changing events in our living environments. Many of these events, are more or less stressful. Amygdala, a nuclei complex located deep inside the temporal lobe, has emerged as a central hub of stress processing in our brain. One prominent feature which distinguishes amygdala from many of its neighboring regions such as hippocampus and cortex is that the inhibitory tone in this region is particularly high under resting state. Such a highly inhibitory tone, which is primarily sustained by GABAergic interneuronal network, is thought to be prerequisite for our brain to filter most neutral events and prevent us to generate inappropriate emotional and behavioral response to these events. However, when we are exposed to a stressful state, the GABAergic inhibition in amygdala will be quickly removed, which, as a consequence, allows the swift transfer of the stressful information from amygdala to the downstream nuclei in the hypothalamus, middle brain and brainstem to elicit appropriate behavioral and emotional response. As such, dynamic GABAergic regulation in amygdala has constituted one of the kernel neurobiological bases of stress processing in brain. Of note is that several extreme states of stress such as earthquake and wars may cause desregulation of GABAergic inhibition in amygdala, which is generally manifested as persistent loss of GABAergic control of amygdala. Such disinhibition is known to essentially contribute to the development of a spectrum of stress-related neuropsychological diseases such anxiety disorders and depression. Many of the pharmacological therapeutics available for treatment of mental illness have their anxiolytic and/or antidepressant effects partially through augmenting GABAergic inhibition in amygdala.

In this Research Topic, we aim to collect original research articles as well as reviews and perspective articles to 1) provide novel basic and clinical evidence regarding the molecular, synaptic and circuit mechanisms underlying the GABAergic control of amygdala and its regulation/desregulation by stress; 2) find new approaches targeting GABAergic regulation in amygdala to prevent and treat stress-related neuropsychiatric illness.


Keywords: Amygdala, GABA, stress, inhibition, neuropsychiatric illness


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top