Research Topic

Biological and Therapeutic Roles of Glycine Receptors

About this Research Topic

Inhibitory glycine receptors ligand-gated ion channels with known roles in startle disease/hyperekplexia (GlyR α1), cortical neuronal migration and autism spectrum disorder (GlyR α2), and inflammatory pain sensitization and rhythmic breathing (GlyR α3). However, recent studies have revealed that GlyRs have many additional roles – for example, in the risk of panic disorder, retinal and auditory function, regulating ethanol consumption, cortical neuronal migration and circuit formation, as well as involvement in long-term potentiation and object recognition memory. There is also significant interest in GlyR α3 as a target for novel analgesics. We encourage original research or methods papers, reviews, commentaries, or perspectives that highlight new biological and therapeutic roles of glycine receptors, utilising molecular, cellular, high-throughput drug screening, electrophysiology or model organism approaches.


Keywords: glycine, glycine receptors, autism, startle disease, neuronal migration, inflammatory pain, rhythmic breathing, panic disorder, retina, hearing, alcohol, learning and memory, molecular biology, neuroscience, zebrafish, mouse, model organism, electrophysiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Inhibitory glycine receptors ligand-gated ion channels with known roles in startle disease/hyperekplexia (GlyR α1), cortical neuronal migration and autism spectrum disorder (GlyR α2), and inflammatory pain sensitization and rhythmic breathing (GlyR α3). However, recent studies have revealed that GlyRs have many additional roles – for example, in the risk of panic disorder, retinal and auditory function, regulating ethanol consumption, cortical neuronal migration and circuit formation, as well as involvement in long-term potentiation and object recognition memory. There is also significant interest in GlyR α3 as a target for novel analgesics. We encourage original research or methods papers, reviews, commentaries, or perspectives that highlight new biological and therapeutic roles of glycine receptors, utilising molecular, cellular, high-throughput drug screening, electrophysiology or model organism approaches.


Keywords: glycine, glycine receptors, autism, startle disease, neuronal migration, inflammatory pain, rhythmic breathing, panic disorder, retina, hearing, alcohol, learning and memory, molecular biology, neuroscience, zebrafish, mouse, model organism, electrophysiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2017 Abstract
30 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2017 Abstract
30 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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