Research Topic

Integrative Brain Function Down Under

About this Research Topic

This Research Topic focuses on research from Australia (aka “Down Under”) that seeks to understand how the brain interacts with the world. We are seeking contributions from Australian researchers interested in understanding how the brain integrates information at multiple scales, from single cells and synapses, to circuits and networks, to whole brain systems. Ultimately, we are interested in how the activity of individual nerve cells and the circuits within which they are embedded yield to behavior, with a focus on the key brain functions that underlie attention, prediction and decision-making.

Crucial to this endeavor is the development of new experimental instruments and computational tools to complement existing neuroscience techniques used to study the brain. We are therefore also interested in submissions in this area. Finally, we aim to use the information obtained to build better models of brain function, as well as to develop new technologies to repair, restore and replace the damaged brain and nervous system. In summary, by integrating the research by neuroscientists, physicists, engineers and computer scientists this Research Topic hopes to unravel the mysteries of the brain and how it interacts with the world


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

This Research Topic focuses on research from Australia (aka “Down Under”) that seeks to understand how the brain interacts with the world. We are seeking contributions from Australian researchers interested in understanding how the brain integrates information at multiple scales, from single cells and synapses, to circuits and networks, to whole brain systems. Ultimately, we are interested in how the activity of individual nerve cells and the circuits within which they are embedded yield to behavior, with a focus on the key brain functions that underlie attention, prediction and decision-making.

Crucial to this endeavor is the development of new experimental instruments and computational tools to complement existing neuroscience techniques used to study the brain. We are therefore also interested in submissions in this area. Finally, we aim to use the information obtained to build better models of brain function, as well as to develop new technologies to repair, restore and replace the damaged brain and nervous system. In summary, by integrating the research by neuroscientists, physicists, engineers and computer scientists this Research Topic hopes to unravel the mysteries of the brain and how it interacts with the world


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 March 2018 Abstract
29 June 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 March 2018 Abstract
29 June 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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