Research Topic

Skin Functions and Mechanisms

About this Research Topic

The search for further knowledge on skin functions and mechanisms is at the core of many biomedical and biopharmaceutical research programs today. The extension and complexity of the skin justifies its multiple roles, affecting all physiological processes, far beyond its “barrier” characteristics. More research on skin physiology is needed to better understand various disease mechanisms, and these need not be confined to the skin itself. Skin is also a target for new molecules, supplements, materials and even instruments, with the potential to impact the whole body. Because of its accessibility and relative dimension, it is also a model to study several other body functions, including occupational impacts and adaptation to extreme (including non-terrestrial) conditions.

This holistic vision of human skin explains why skin functions and mechanisms are no longer exclusive subjects of dermatology, but rather a broad knowledge nucleus, attracting researchers from all areas. Whether coming from physiology and pathophysiology, from pharmacology, toxicology, chemistry and pharmaceutical science, from dermatology, cosmetic medicine or plastic surgery - you will be welcomed to contribute with your best research to our “Skin Functions and Mechanisms” research topic, to be housed in Frontiers in Physiology, actively linking scientists, clinical researchers and technicians sharing this common interest within human physiology.

This Research Topic aims to deepen insight into the multiple skin characteristics in health and disease, opening a stage for innovation regarding new physiological principles or mechanisms. We welcome submission of research at the molecular, sub-cellular, cellular, organ, and organism level, including system and integrative physiology, and clinical proof-of-concept and/or translational studies.

Submissions to this Research Topic can be any of the article types accepted by Frontiers in Physiology (e.g., original research, methods, hypothesis & theory, opinions, etc.). Your contribution to our global scientific community can enhance this knowledge confluence and support an improved understanding of “Skin Functions and Mechanisms”.


Keywords: skin physiology, disease mechanisms, in vivo research, skin biometrics, topical efficacy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The search for further knowledge on skin functions and mechanisms is at the core of many biomedical and biopharmaceutical research programs today. The extension and complexity of the skin justifies its multiple roles, affecting all physiological processes, far beyond its “barrier” characteristics. More research on skin physiology is needed to better understand various disease mechanisms, and these need not be confined to the skin itself. Skin is also a target for new molecules, supplements, materials and even instruments, with the potential to impact the whole body. Because of its accessibility and relative dimension, it is also a model to study several other body functions, including occupational impacts and adaptation to extreme (including non-terrestrial) conditions.

This holistic vision of human skin explains why skin functions and mechanisms are no longer exclusive subjects of dermatology, but rather a broad knowledge nucleus, attracting researchers from all areas. Whether coming from physiology and pathophysiology, from pharmacology, toxicology, chemistry and pharmaceutical science, from dermatology, cosmetic medicine or plastic surgery - you will be welcomed to contribute with your best research to our “Skin Functions and Mechanisms” research topic, to be housed in Frontiers in Physiology, actively linking scientists, clinical researchers and technicians sharing this common interest within human physiology.

This Research Topic aims to deepen insight into the multiple skin characteristics in health and disease, opening a stage for innovation regarding new physiological principles or mechanisms. We welcome submission of research at the molecular, sub-cellular, cellular, organ, and organism level, including system and integrative physiology, and clinical proof-of-concept and/or translational studies.

Submissions to this Research Topic can be any of the article types accepted by Frontiers in Physiology (e.g., original research, methods, hypothesis & theory, opinions, etc.). Your contribution to our global scientific community can enhance this knowledge confluence and support an improved understanding of “Skin Functions and Mechanisms”.


Keywords: skin physiology, disease mechanisms, in vivo research, skin biometrics, topical efficacy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

21 January 2018 Abstract
31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

21 January 2018 Abstract
31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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