Research Topic

Biomarkers in Neurology

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Early diagnosis of most neurological disorders is considered mainstay for early and successful management. The difficult accessibility to brain tissue represent major problem in diagnosis of brain diseases. Moreover, evaluation of disease progress and predicting prognosis is hampered by the lack of sensitive ...

Early diagnosis of most neurological disorders is considered mainstay for early and successful management. The difficult accessibility to brain tissue represent major problem in diagnosis of brain diseases. Moreover, evaluation of disease progress and predicting prognosis is hampered by the lack of sensitive and specific diagnostic tools. Biomarkers definition exceeds the conventional understanding of chemical changes that accompany the disease process. Nowadays, we have radiological biomarkers, genetic biomarkers and even microbial biomarkers (microbiomarkers). In some cases early diagnostic clinical tests are considered biomarkers. As such, research in the field of biomarkers development is multidsciplinary, involving biochemists, geneticists, neurologists, radiologists and more.

In certain neurodegenerative disorders e.g. Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) the lack of sensitive early biomarker of the disease leads to failure of most neuroprotective agents as they are usually tried very late to pose a difference in disease progress. The issue of biomarkers development, however, is not restricted to being capable of early diagnosis of the disease. Indeed, the challenge of sensitivity and specificity is a major one. The ability to differentiate between various neurological disorders seems mandatory, moreover, the usefulness in identifying every case is another need. Another challenge is the applicability of a biomarker. For example, brain biopsy can evidently diagnose most of neurodegenerative diseases. But, by any way, this cannot be a routine diagnostic tool. One extra point that must be taken in consideration when developing a biomarker is the economic feasibility of it. A super expensive test, that can be obtained only in certain areas of the world will not help a lot. Instead, a low price, accessible biomarker is the ideal choice for all clinicians.

The aim of this Research Topic is to begin a dialogue regarding methods of developing, validation and accreditation of biomarkers for brain damage. As can be seen from the diversity of biomarkers nature, this proposal is open to different scientists who could be interested. The final aim of our project is to reach an easy, accessible and cost effective yet sensitive and specific biomarker for brain disease. We would like also to raise the attention of validation methods of a biomarker before adoption for clinical practice. Simply, developing a realistic biomarker for brain disease could form a paradigm shift in management of this disorder.


Keywords: Biomarkers, Validation, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Microbiomarkers, Genomics, Neuro-Proteins, Autoantibodies


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