Research Topic

Balancing Act: Structural-Functional Circuit Disruptions and Compensations in Developing and Aging Brain Disorders

About this Research Topic

Behaviors and underlying brain circuits display characteristic changes across the life-span that produce sensitive windows of vulnerability and resilience to neuropathology. Abundant research has already proved that disruptions in the network connectivity patterns of brain areas and communities have been ...

Behaviors and underlying brain circuits display characteristic changes across the life-span that produce sensitive windows of vulnerability and resilience to neuropathology. Abundant research has already proved that disruptions in the network connectivity patterns of brain areas and communities have been linked to variable levels of neuropsychological recovery observed in individual patients with brain disorders. Therefore, understanding the course of these changes may help understand how they contribute to risk and resilience for both developing and aging brain disorders, and may offer personalized treatment opportunities. It is still uncertain whether and how the balance act of disruptions and compensations in large-scale structural-functional brain network organization across individuals in various brain disorders.

To date, the dynamic and flexible variation in both structural brain network organization and functional activity has been observed across the healthy adult life span. Facing brain damages, two criteria were established as necessary for cortical activity differences to be more likely to be regarded as “compensatory”. First, novel activity increases not seen in healthy controls must be associated with correct behavioral outcomes. Second, deficits in processing by one region must be associated with increases in activity in the putative compensatory region. In addition, dynamic interaction of brain systems refers to the fact that circuit function and behavior will vary across developing and aging life span following various brain disorders as different components of neural circuits mature according to different trajectories. However, this balance act still needs to be elucidated from the brain network connectivity patterns and better described by developing novel methods to reveal network characteristic and organization. Potential clinical implications include identifying novel treatment neuroimaging biomarkers and monitoring response to treatment in these patients.

This Research Topic seeks contributions that will improve our understanding of how the brain network is affected by disturbances and compensations in patients with psychiatric or neurological diseases.

Acceptable forms of manuscripts include original research articles, systematic reviews, methods, protocols, technology reports, reviews, mini reviews and perspectives.


Keywords: brain connectivity network, functional compensate, neuroimaging biomarkers, developing and aging disorders


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top
);