Research Topic

Lower frequency brain oscillations in perception

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Neuronal elements underlying perception exhibit distinct oscillatory phenomena. However, how these oscillatory signatures map onto perception has remained largely elusive.


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Neuronal elements underlying perception exhibit distinct oscillatory phenomena. However, how these oscillatory signatures map onto perception has remained largely elusive.



Traditionally, research has focused on higher-frequency oscillations in the gamma-band (30-100Hz) and has linked this activity to sensory operations such as feature binding, conscious perception and more. Over the past few years, a considerable number of findings has emerged that start to assign distinct roles in perception to lower frequency oscillations in the theta (4-8Hz) and alpha bands (8-14Hz).



With the present Research Topic, we welcome reviews, original research and opinion articles to provide an overview of what has been discovered in the past few years on this topic, on how this has informed models on perception and may inspire new approaches in BCI, bio-feedback and interventional transcranial stimulation techniques. This covers evidence from both human and animal electrophysiology on the mapping between spectral features (phase and amplitude) in lower frequency bands, network interactions, anatomy and the perceptual fate of sensory events, either when these events are incoming or to be kept in working memory. It also covers contributions from other approaches than electrophysiology such as psychophysics, TMS or tACS (probing for consequences of rhythmic stimulation on perception), or combined EEG-fMRI (on the co-variation of EEG and BOLD-signals in areas of the attention and visual network).



Recent studies converge on a role of lower frequency oscillations in sensory sampling, regulation of neuronal excitability in anticipation of incoming events and the routing of information flow across the network, among other operations, the scope of which we feel would be of great interest to feature and discuss in a Research Topic.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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