Research Topic

Neurosensory Alterations from Blast Exposure and Blunt Impact

About this Research Topic

Combinations of auditory (hearing), vestibular (balance) and visual (sight) impairments have been reported to be the most prevalent disabilities experienced in military personnel and civilians exposed to blast shockwaves, while changes in smell and taste are also common. Although alterations may be transient ...

Combinations of auditory (hearing), vestibular (balance) and visual (sight) impairments have been reported to be the most prevalent disabilities experienced in military personnel and civilians exposed to blast shockwaves, while changes in smell and taste are also common. Although alterations may be transient following mild trauma, more severe cases often may lead to permanent neurosensory disabilities. The Research Topic presented here seeks reports that focus on disruptive effects on neurosensory systems following primary blast (blast overpressure) and blunt impact that are experienced by Warfighters and civilians. This includes but is not limited to: functional and behavioural changes, clinical symptomatology, biomarkers, neuroimaging, animal and human studies, pathophysiology, sex-differences, co-morbidities, inflammation, acute and long-term consequences, promising technologies to detect co-morbidities such as mild traumatic brain injury, systems biology, epidemiology, computational models, regenerative therapies and cellular-imaging studies with multiphoton microscopy that are associated with neurosensory perturbations.

The majority of civilian trauma leading to neurosensory perturbations are from falls and motor-vehicular accidents. On the other hand, militarily-relevant neurosensory perturbations typically result from blast injuries sustained following exposure to overpressure from improvised explosive devices (IEDs), heavy weapon system operations and training environments, and blunt impact from debris and shrapnel from the explosion ejecta. Despite several epidemiological studies reporting that neurosensory perturbations are commonly encountered among the victims of blast and blunt trauma, studies that address the underpinnings of these issues are relatively few compared to other consequences of brain trauma. Considering the prevalence of long-lasting debilitations adversely impacting the quality of life, it is crucial to address the challenges in mitigating neurosensory perturbations related to trauma.

Researchers, scientists, and clinicians engaged in this field are welcome to contribute an original article, technical and methodological report, or review article to this Research Topic.


Keywords: Touch, Smell, Hearing, Tinnitus, Vision, Auditory, Blast Overpressure, Blunt Impact to Head, Shrapnel, Debris


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

20 February 2020 Manuscript

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Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

20 February 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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