Research Topic

Phosphodiesterases as Drug Targets in Airway and Inflammatory Diseases

About this Research Topic

Recently, several new drugs have been introduced to treat obstructive lung diseases associated with inflammation (e.g. bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]), including long-acting bronchodilators, corticosteroids and monoclonal antibodies. Despite these new medicines, there are still ...

Recently, several new drugs have been introduced to treat obstructive lung diseases associated with inflammation (e.g. bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]), including long-acting bronchodilators, corticosteroids and monoclonal antibodies. Despite these new medicines, there are still patients who might benefit from a more selective approach to treatment given that this may be accompanied by fewer adverse effects, especially when a combination of drugs is required to manage severe disease.

The possibility that inhibiting certain phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes (in particular PDE3 and PDE4) and, thereby, increasing the concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in specific tissues and organs, may have therapeutic benefit has gained general acceptance over the last 30 years. Indeed, PDEs have become attractive drug targets because an increase in cAMP can relax smooth muscle and suppress inflammation. Currently, roflumilast, a selective PDE4 inhibitor, is the only drug in this class that has been approved for the treatment of a particular subset of patients with COPD. Disease guidelines recommend that roflumilast be used as an add-on therapy in people categorised as high risk, having severe, symptomatic COPD in whom exacerbations occur despite regular treatment with a combination of a long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist, a long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonist and an inhaled corticosteroid. However, roflumilast has a low therapeutic ratio and ways to improve effectiveness and tolerability are needed. Possibilities include the development of dual- or multi-specificity agents or drugs that as designed for inhalation.

Clearly, part of this process is to collect sufficient evidence about the efficacy and safety of these molecules in animal models and in the clinical settings in COPD, as well as in other inflammatory diseases. In this respect, manuscripts are invited that describe recent developments in PDE research and of their inhibitors in diseases of respiratory system and other illnesses associated with chronic inflammation in both experimental and clinical settings.

Manuscripts may include Original Research articles, Systematic Reviews, Mini Reviews, or Perspectives. We strongly recommend an abstract be submitted prior to submission of the full article.


Keywords: phosphodiesterase, inhibitor, inflammation, airway, lung, COPD, bronchial asthma


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03 November 2019 Manuscript
18 December 2019 Manuscript Extension

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 November 2019 Manuscript
18 December 2019 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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