Research Topic

Outsmarting the Host: How Bacterial Pathogens Modulate Immune Responses in The Lung

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Every day, thousands of bacteria gain access into the respiratory epithelium. This contact initiates complex interactions between the lung and the microbes. Host environments, including temperature, pH, ionic strength, mucus viscosity, and pulmonary surfactant prompt bacteria to modulate genes required for ...

Every day, thousands of bacteria gain access into the respiratory epithelium. This contact initiates complex interactions between the lung and the microbes. Host environments, including temperature, pH, ionic strength, mucus viscosity, and pulmonary surfactant prompt bacteria to modulate genes required for invasion, evasion and proliferation. The lung elaborates both innate and acquired immune defenses to counter potentially pathogenic bacterial infections. Taking advantage of the compromised lung immunity caused by primary viral infection, external exposures, impaired mucus clearance mechanisms, ventilator-associated injuries, and other factors, bacterial pathogens and opportunistic commensals establish infection by deploying multi-pronged strategies that involve the bacterial capsule, cell wall, surface appendages, biofilms, secreted and injected virulence determinants. The interplays between bacteria and host result in varied clinical outcomes ranging from full recovery, acute necrotizing pneumonia and pneumonia-derived sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction, to the persistent biofilm-dominated infection in chronically-diseased airways. Understanding the complex interactions between the respiratory epithelium, host immunity and bacterial pathogens may allow more effective therapeutic strategies against pneumonia.

The goal of this Research Topic is to highlight current knowledge and research trends of bacterial pathogenesis in the context of pulmonary immunity and function, and to update ongoing and future antibacterial strategies. We welcome the submission of Original Research, Review, Mini-Review and Opinion articles that cover different aspects of host immune modulation by respiratory bacterial pathogens, which include but are not limited to:

1. Bacterial virulence determinants that mediate evasion, subversion, and modulation of lung innate and adaptive immunity.
2. Host factors that are involved in pathogen recognition and determination of the success and failure of lung infection, such as innate immune receptors (TLRs, CLRs, NLRs) and downstream signaling mechanisms.
3. The impact of respiratory viral-secondary bacterial infections on lung immunity.
4. The influence of antibacterials, antibacterial resistance, and phage therapy in modulating lung immunity in health and disease.
5. Nonantibiotic based immuno-modulating therapies against respiratory bacterial infections.


Keywords: Bacterial Respiratory Infection, Super-infection, Pulmonary Diseases, Virulence Determinants, Immune Response


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..