Research Topic

Mechanisms of Neuronal Recovery in the Central Nervous System

About this Research Topic

The central nervous system (CNS) is highly plastic and allows for the integration of new neuronal circuits and vascular networks. However, it has minimal capacity for self-renewal, notably lacking robust mechanisms of adaptation to injury and reduced flexibility in terms of tissue repair and healing. ...

The central nervous system (CNS) is highly plastic and allows for the integration of new neuronal circuits and vascular networks. However, it has minimal capacity for self-renewal, notably lacking robust mechanisms of adaptation to injury and reduced flexibility in terms of tissue repair and healing. Nonetheless, we are getting new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that restore neuronal function following acute CNS damage or under chronic neurodegeneration.

The best-characterized mechanisms that aid in recovery of the brain and spinal cord following CNS injury include: 1) neurogenesis and angiogenesis; 2) the regulation of inflammation; 3) the modulation of blood-brain barrier dynamics and exchange with peripheral systems; 4) the provision of adequate energy metabolism; and 5) the promotion of axonal growth and regeneration. These mechanisms of cellular and molecular adaptation to injury have been described in cases like stroke or traumatic injury, in which restricted brain fueling is critical. Moreover, plenty of these mechanisms have been described under conditions of chronic neurodegeneration such as in the case of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Lastly, similar mechanisms have also been observed during development under the circumstances produced by altered maturation such as in epilepsy and autism.

In this Research Topic, we aim to gather recent discoveries that dig deep into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that coordinate neuronal recovery under different scenarios of CNS damage. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive restorative brain pathways is key to develop effective clinical interventions that will enable the recovery of lost functions and the enhancement of physical well-being and functional ability of affected individuals.

We welcome contributions in the form of Original Research, Review, Brief Research Report, Conceptual Analyses, Editorial, Focused Review, Hypothesis and Theory, Mini Review, Perspective, or Systematic Review. We encourage the submission of articles that cover the following themes:
• Cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuronal function restoration
• Cellular and molecular mechanisms of adaptive responses of the CNS to injury
• Mechanisms of developmental alterations that impact CNS function
• Cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration


Keywords: Neuronal Recovery, CNS, CNS Injury, Neurodegeneration, Axonal Regeneration


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Submission Deadlines

15 January 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 January 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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