Research Topic

Science Education in Public Diplomacy

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Establishing trust between nations requires a level of openness that fosters mutual understanding. This is especially true in countries separated by degrees of economic development, where feelings of distrust felt by a less developed nation may cast perceptions of imperialistic intents upon the activities of ...

Establishing trust between nations requires a level of openness that fosters mutual understanding. This is especially true in countries separated by degrees of economic development, where feelings of distrust felt by a less developed nation may cast perceptions of imperialistic intents upon the activities of more industrialized nations. Furthermore, between countries that do not enjoy advanced diplomatic relationships, there may appear to be no clear path to realizing cross-border connections in a top-down manner.

Science diplomacy has emerged as a new field to foster collaboration between nations. Within this field, science education has allowed to rapidly cross borders to create large collaborative projects. Moreover, the creation of international innovation communities has permitted the introduction of education and entrepreneurship concepts across the world, while bypassing diplomatic formalities. While current times are marked by increased diplomatic tensions between nations, it has become clear that several “underground” education communities have undertaken the role of non-state actors of public diplomacy. From using technology to rescue ancestral knowledge, to GMO education in local communities, this Research Topic will portray the role of scientists and educators in promoting bilateral understanding between nations.

We welcome manuscripts from scientists, educators, policy makers and citizen scientists that cover the following sub-topics:

- Increasing understanding between countries through science education
- Analyzing cases of science diplomacy at work in developing nations
- Promises and perils of collaborations between research institutions in developed and developing nations
- Science education in war zones and marginalized communities
- Respect for national sovereignty vs. reliance in foreign capital in local knowledge creation
- Helicopter science vs. participatory discovery
- STEM education as a driver of policy changes
- Technology innovation and conservation of ancestral knowledge
- GMO education in the developing world
- Scientific innovation in developing nations
- Seeding a global community through startup hubs


Keywords: Science Diplomacy, Multinational Education, Scientific Collaborations, STEM Education and Globalization


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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