Research Topic

Emerging Roles for Type 2-associated Cells and Cytokines in Cancer Immunity

About this Research Topic

Type 2 Immune responses are “traditionally” studied in the context of parasite infections and allergic diseases. Nonetheless, recent advances in the field have broadened our perspectives regarding the activity of type 2 immunity. For example, ILC2 cells, eosinophils, macrophages, and the cytokines IL-33, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-4 create an important signaling and effector cell axis in metabolism, tissue regeneration and even neuroinflammation. These exciting new data highlight the possibility that the role of type 2 immunity in cancer has been overlooked and requires further examination.

In support of this, classical type 2-associated cells such as eosinophils have pleiotropic activities. On the one hand, they can provide growth and angiogenic factors to promote tumor growth. On the other, eosinophils can orchestrate anti-tumor immune responses via various mechanisms including direct cell-mediated cytotoxicity, regulation of the vasculature, and enhancement of CD8+ cytotoxic T cell activities.

In this Research Topic, roles of the classical Th2 cytokines (e.g. IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) and their cognate receptors as well as epithelial cell-derived cytokines, such as IL-33 and TSLP, will be discussed in the context of cancer. In addition, the roles of type 2 innate immune cells such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and IL-4-polarized macrophages as well as their interactions with adaptive immune cells and roles in emerging immunotherapies will be considered.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather a comprehensive overview of the detrimental as well as beneficial roles of type 2 immunity in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, we welcome the submission of Reviews and Original Research articles covering the following topics:

1. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines in malignancies
2. The roles of IL-33, TSLP and IL-25 in the tumor microenvironment and their potential as target for therapies
3. Interactions between mast cells, basophils, eosinophils and T cells in the tumor microenvironment.
4. Role of ILC2 cells in tumor progression and immune regulation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Type 2 Immune responses are “traditionally” studied in the context of parasite infections and allergic diseases. Nonetheless, recent advances in the field have broadened our perspectives regarding the activity of type 2 immunity. For example, ILC2 cells, eosinophils, macrophages, and the cytokines IL-33, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-4 create an important signaling and effector cell axis in metabolism, tissue regeneration and even neuroinflammation. These exciting new data highlight the possibility that the role of type 2 immunity in cancer has been overlooked and requires further examination.

In support of this, classical type 2-associated cells such as eosinophils have pleiotropic activities. On the one hand, they can provide growth and angiogenic factors to promote tumor growth. On the other, eosinophils can orchestrate anti-tumor immune responses via various mechanisms including direct cell-mediated cytotoxicity, regulation of the vasculature, and enhancement of CD8+ cytotoxic T cell activities.

In this Research Topic, roles of the classical Th2 cytokines (e.g. IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) and their cognate receptors as well as epithelial cell-derived cytokines, such as IL-33 and TSLP, will be discussed in the context of cancer. In addition, the roles of type 2 innate immune cells such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and IL-4-polarized macrophages as well as their interactions with adaptive immune cells and roles in emerging immunotherapies will be considered.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather a comprehensive overview of the detrimental as well as beneficial roles of type 2 immunity in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, we welcome the submission of Reviews and Original Research articles covering the following topics:

1. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines in malignancies
2. The roles of IL-33, TSLP and IL-25 in the tumor microenvironment and their potential as target for therapies
3. Interactions between mast cells, basophils, eosinophils and T cells in the tumor microenvironment.
4. Role of ILC2 cells in tumor progression and immune regulation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 March 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 March 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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