Research Topic

Clinical Applications of Anti-Mullerian Hormone Measurement in Reproductive Medicine

About this Research Topic

Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) is a glycoprotein hormone which is exclusively produced in
ovarian granulosa cells in adult women and released to the blood circulation, which can be measured by commercial assays including manual ELISA and automated chemiluminescence methods. Having good correlation with primordial and antral follicle counts, AMH has been introduced as a marker of ovarian reserve and function, and has been explored for applications in a number of clinical settings, particularly in reproductive medicine.

These include the differential diagnosis of anovulatory disorders, particularly polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian failure, prediction of ovarian insufficiency associated with natural or iatrogenic menopause, as well as prediction of ovarian response to stimulation in assisted reproduction. As AMH is secreted in a stable manner with relatively less intra- and inter-cycle variations and is less susceptible to influence by exogenous hormones, it has evolved as a superior marker of ovarian function compared to pituitary gonadotrophins and oestradiol.

This proposed Research Topic will consist of mini-reviews on the various topics related to the biological basis of AMH in human reproductive physiology, evolution of the AMH assay as well as the current knowledge and future directions of its applications in the various clinical settings. This will provide clinicians and researchers a comprehensive update on this hot topic in the field of reproductive endocrinology and infertility.

Sub-Topics to be covered in this Research Topic (not limited to):
- Molecular biology and signaling of AMH
- AMH in normal reproductive physiology
- Challenges in Measuring AMH
- Ethnicity and age-specific reference ranges of serum AMH in women
- Use of AMH in the differential diagnosis of disorders of sex development
- Use of AMH in the differential diagnosis of anovulatory disorders including PCOS
- Role of AMH in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome
- Role of AMH in prediction of menopause
- Role of AMH in the management of cancer survivors
- Utility of AMH in assisted reproduction
- Future research directions on the clinical utility of AMH measurements


Keywords: Anti-Mullerian hormone, anovulation, fertility, ovarian reserve, polycystic ovary syndrome


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) is a glycoprotein hormone which is exclusively produced in
ovarian granulosa cells in adult women and released to the blood circulation, which can be measured by commercial assays including manual ELISA and automated chemiluminescence methods. Having good correlation with primordial and antral follicle counts, AMH has been introduced as a marker of ovarian reserve and function, and has been explored for applications in a number of clinical settings, particularly in reproductive medicine.

These include the differential diagnosis of anovulatory disorders, particularly polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian failure, prediction of ovarian insufficiency associated with natural or iatrogenic menopause, as well as prediction of ovarian response to stimulation in assisted reproduction. As AMH is secreted in a stable manner with relatively less intra- and inter-cycle variations and is less susceptible to influence by exogenous hormones, it has evolved as a superior marker of ovarian function compared to pituitary gonadotrophins and oestradiol.

This proposed Research Topic will consist of mini-reviews on the various topics related to the biological basis of AMH in human reproductive physiology, evolution of the AMH assay as well as the current knowledge and future directions of its applications in the various clinical settings. This will provide clinicians and researchers a comprehensive update on this hot topic in the field of reproductive endocrinology and infertility.

Sub-Topics to be covered in this Research Topic (not limited to):
- Molecular biology and signaling of AMH
- AMH in normal reproductive physiology
- Challenges in Measuring AMH
- Ethnicity and age-specific reference ranges of serum AMH in women
- Use of AMH in the differential diagnosis of disorders of sex development
- Use of AMH in the differential diagnosis of anovulatory disorders including PCOS
- Role of AMH in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome
- Role of AMH in prediction of menopause
- Role of AMH in the management of cancer survivors
- Utility of AMH in assisted reproduction
- Future research directions on the clinical utility of AMH measurements


Keywords: Anti-Mullerian hormone, anovulation, fertility, ovarian reserve, polycystic ovary syndrome


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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