Research Topic

Non-Pharmacological Interventions in Acquired and Age-Related Cognitive Disorders

About this Research Topic

Non-pharmacological interventions, including cognitive training (CT), cognitive rehabilitation (CR), brain stimulation techniques (such as transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)), and behavioral interventions have been associated with improvement of cognition and behavior in patients with different neurological conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of these interventions in patients with acquired brain injuries, such as vascular diseases, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Benefits have also been shown in patients with age related disorders, such as subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment. These benefits have been seen mainly in near transfer tasks (related to the tasks trained) and using cognitive paper and pencil or computerized tests.

Despite these previous studies showing cognitive and behavioral improvement after non-pharmacological interventions, there is still a lack of studies elucidating what types, frequency and duration of non-pharmacological intervention protocols are more effective. Furthermore, there is a lack of information on which of these tasks are most closely related to everyday difficulties in the lives of these patients. In recent years, efforts by researchers in the field have been made to change the focus of those interventions to more ecological approaches akin to everyday life challenges. In addition, outcome measures including generalization and far transfer effects tasks (not directly related to the training stimuli) and real life complaints questionnaires about the use of efficient strategies have recently been developed.

We invite investigators to contribute with Original Research and Review Articles that focus on the underlying cognitive, behavioral and brain mechanisms of new non-pharmacological interventions. These may include cognitive training, cognitive rehabilitation and remediation, behavioral interventions, non-invasive brain stimulation (such as transcranial magnetic, electrical or infrared light stimulation) in populations with:

• Acquired brain injuries (stroke, brain vascular diseases, traumatic brain injury, encephalopathies, brain tumors)

• Age related cognitive decline and dementia (healthy aging, subjective cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias)


Keywords: non-pharmacological interventions, Cognitive training, Cognitive rehabilitation, neurological disorders, aging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Non-pharmacological interventions, including cognitive training (CT), cognitive rehabilitation (CR), brain stimulation techniques (such as transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)), and behavioral interventions have been associated with improvement of cognition and behavior in patients with different neurological conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of these interventions in patients with acquired brain injuries, such as vascular diseases, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Benefits have also been shown in patients with age related disorders, such as subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment. These benefits have been seen mainly in near transfer tasks (related to the tasks trained) and using cognitive paper and pencil or computerized tests.

Despite these previous studies showing cognitive and behavioral improvement after non-pharmacological interventions, there is still a lack of studies elucidating what types, frequency and duration of non-pharmacological intervention protocols are more effective. Furthermore, there is a lack of information on which of these tasks are most closely related to everyday difficulties in the lives of these patients. In recent years, efforts by researchers in the field have been made to change the focus of those interventions to more ecological approaches akin to everyday life challenges. In addition, outcome measures including generalization and far transfer effects tasks (not directly related to the training stimuli) and real life complaints questionnaires about the use of efficient strategies have recently been developed.

We invite investigators to contribute with Original Research and Review Articles that focus on the underlying cognitive, behavioral and brain mechanisms of new non-pharmacological interventions. These may include cognitive training, cognitive rehabilitation and remediation, behavioral interventions, non-invasive brain stimulation (such as transcranial magnetic, electrical or infrared light stimulation) in populations with:

• Acquired brain injuries (stroke, brain vascular diseases, traumatic brain injury, encephalopathies, brain tumors)

• Age related cognitive decline and dementia (healthy aging, subjective cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias)


Keywords: non-pharmacological interventions, Cognitive training, Cognitive rehabilitation, neurological disorders, aging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

22 May 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

22 May 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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