Research Topic

Non-Dietary Therapies for Gluten-Related Disorders

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About this Research Topic

Gluten is a family of proteins which are commonly found in grains and cereals, including, among others: wheat, rye, and barley. Celiac disease is a common immune-mediated, chronic enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals, which causes villous atrophy and ...

Gluten is a family of proteins which are commonly found in grains and cereals, including, among others: wheat, rye, and barley. Celiac disease is a common immune-mediated, chronic enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals, which causes villous atrophy and malabsorption. The only available treatment for this condition is a lifelong, strict, gluten-free diet, which may severely affect patients quality of life. However, novel potential therapies have been recently proposed, and some of them are currently being studied.

The engineering of peptide-based immunotherapy that could specifically silence the adverse inflammatory cascade triggered by gluten proteins is currently one of the most promising therapies for celiac disease. Other possible therapies include strategies for reducing gluten exposure, alteration of gluten peptides, and development of molecules targeting inflammation.

In the last decades, another gluten-related disorder known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity, has also increasingly drawn attention. This condition is characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten occurring in patients in whom celiac disease and wheat allergy have been excluded. Despite the huge social impact of this condition, convincing evidence regarding its pathogenic bases are lacking and some research considers it as a part of the spectrum of functional gastrointestinal disorder. Amylase-trypsin inhibitors are found in gluten-containing foods and have been shown to induce intestinal inflammation. Microbiome-modulation strategies may potentially revert this effect, but data is still scant.

The aim of this Research Topic is therefore to highlight and explore the current knowledge into gluten-related disorders, with a focus on non-dietary therapies. We welcome reviews and original research articles on themes such as:

1. Immunotherapy for celiac disease
2. Strategies for reducing gluten exposure
3. Mechanisms of inflammation in gluten-related disorders
4. Prevention and treatment of celiac disease complications
5. Evaluation of gut microbiota in gluten-related disorders
6. Microbiome-manipulation strategies in gluten-related disorders


Keywords: Celiac Disease, Gliadin, Gluten Allergy, Immunotherapy, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity


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