Research Topic

Non-human Primate Models of Psychiatric Disorders

About this Research Topic

Our current understanding of the etiology and the pathophysiology of most psychiatric disorders owes a great debt to the research undertaken with animals. Given the strict ethical limitations to human experimentation, animal models are still the best available alternative to tackle the major challenges and obstacles in this field. Since rodents make up for most of the research models available, several aspects of these disorders cannot be properly modeled. In this sense, there has been exciting news regarding techniques for the study of brain and behavior in primates which allow for more suitable translational studies.

Given the phylogenetic gap between humans and rodents, which translates to considerable differences in physiology and behavioral profiles, nonhuman primates stand as the most appropriate animal models for several psychiatric symptom. For example, tests that rely on the visual system of rodents have relatively less relevant to research with humans whereas the monkeys show remarkable neurophysiological similarities and are able to perform complex tasks (e.g., the use of visual illusions to test for changes in perception).

In this sense, the aim of this research topic is to present recent contributions of primate models to the understanding and treatment of Psychiatric Disorders. We will welcome and actively seek for submissions encompassing all range of models for psychiatric disorders, including but not limited to autism, schizophrenia, addiction, anxiety and depression which employ behavior, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology and neuroanatomy as well as optogenetics, PET and fMRI.

Submission of Original studies as well as Review and Opinion papers on this topic are encouraged. Special interest is devoted to innovative methodological approaches and perspectives.


Keywords: Psychiatric disorders, Non-human Primate models, Neurophysiology, Psychopharmacology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Our current understanding of the etiology and the pathophysiology of most psychiatric disorders owes a great debt to the research undertaken with animals. Given the strict ethical limitations to human experimentation, animal models are still the best available alternative to tackle the major challenges and obstacles in this field. Since rodents make up for most of the research models available, several aspects of these disorders cannot be properly modeled. In this sense, there has been exciting news regarding techniques for the study of brain and behavior in primates which allow for more suitable translational studies.

Given the phylogenetic gap between humans and rodents, which translates to considerable differences in physiology and behavioral profiles, nonhuman primates stand as the most appropriate animal models for several psychiatric symptom. For example, tests that rely on the visual system of rodents have relatively less relevant to research with humans whereas the monkeys show remarkable neurophysiological similarities and are able to perform complex tasks (e.g., the use of visual illusions to test for changes in perception).

In this sense, the aim of this research topic is to present recent contributions of primate models to the understanding and treatment of Psychiatric Disorders. We will welcome and actively seek for submissions encompassing all range of models for psychiatric disorders, including but not limited to autism, schizophrenia, addiction, anxiety and depression which employ behavior, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology and neuroanatomy as well as optogenetics, PET and fMRI.

Submission of Original studies as well as Review and Opinion papers on this topic are encouraged. Special interest is devoted to innovative methodological approaches and perspectives.


Keywords: Psychiatric disorders, Non-human Primate models, Neurophysiology, Psychopharmacology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Abstract
28 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Abstract
28 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..