Research Topic

Perspectives in Neuroscience of Special Education

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Human neuroscience sheds light on brain mechanisms that underpin cognitive and social behavior and on how such mechanisms may become altered in brain disorders. Dyslexia, dyscalculia, ADHD, autism and Asperger’s syndrome, intellectual disabilities, sensory impairment, and other medical conditions constitute ...

Human neuroscience sheds light on brain mechanisms that underpin cognitive and social behavior and on how such mechanisms may become altered in brain disorders. Dyslexia, dyscalculia, ADHD, autism and Asperger’s syndrome, intellectual disabilities, sensory impairment, and other medical conditions constitute challenges for neuroscientists, geneticists, psychologists and educators.
Advances in imaging techniques, psychological research and genomics enable the integration of disciplines that investigate human learning and development, opening up possibilities for the enhancement, update and eventually the reform of educational theories and practices. Our increasing understanding of learning and the application of new knowledge to educational settings can improve learning outcomes. Thus, the potential of neuroscience in making exciting contributions to educational research in general and to special education in particular is now more pronounced than ever.
The need for fruitful, evidence-based interventions is grounded on the fact that intervention may save time and money, relief families, and improve the quality of life of individuals with disabilities. As a result, the neurobiological foundations of special education carry multiple implications for educational policy.
Answers concerning early learning and early intervention, the challenges that individual differences pose, the effectiveness of educational and treatment approaches to developmental disorders, the widening possibilities that brain plasticity brings to normal (e.g. life-long learning) and pathological conditions (e.g. blind readers and wayfarers), and the interaction of genetic and epigenetic factors in disease (e.g. epilepsy) are just a few of the hottest topics in the neuroscience and education convergence. At the same time, the deconstruction of neuromyths, i.e. popular but ill-grounded views about what brain science can actually deliver to education, emerges as a priority for the neuroscience community. The benefits of the interaction between neurobiology and education could be mutual, as education may also conceivably offer a naturalistic framework for research on the brain.
In this Research Topic, we intend to summarize and review research that has been carried out thus far to bridge the gap between the brain sciences and education. We also aim to open up future perspectives for Educational Neuroscience. Articles from all related areas of research – theories, opinion, methods, areas of impact, history – are welcomed.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top