Research Topic

Timing the Brain: From Basic Sciences to Clinical Implications

About this Research Topic

Time is a pervasive process, from the Circadian circle to the integration of multimodal inputs, time is crucial for any function the brain has to perform. A neural process ignoring this phenomenon cannot be the basis for effective interaction with the environment.
Although research on animal models and experimental psychology indicates a critical time binding window as the basis for multimodal integration and an extensive network involving motor and non-motor areas has been studied, no clear evidence of the existence of neural circuits dedicated to time perception is available to date.

Physiopathological, structural ad functional data acquired from research on brain diseases affecting cerebellum, basal ganglia and fronto-parietal networks, as well as not invasive brain stimulation techniques can be used as empirical models to shed light on the putative neural network for time perception. Similarly, computational models can be used to describe how the brain can estimate the duration of an event, when an event has occurred or when an event will take place. These models differ from those of other perceptual modalities because of the intrinsic and intangible nature of time. However, they still address similar issues such as accuracy, neural implementation and integration of disparate stimuli containing temporal information.

In this Research Topic, we aim to collect experimental contributions and review articles
addressing both the role of timing for brain function and the specular perspective on how brain generates timing.
Therefore, we are welcoming contributions about these topics ranging from preclinical studies on cells or animal models to human and computational models concerning both healthy and/or neurologically or psychiatrically impaired people.


Keywords: Time perception, Neural code, Temporal binding window (TBW), Timing, Multimodal integration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Time is a pervasive process, from the Circadian circle to the integration of multimodal inputs, time is crucial for any function the brain has to perform. A neural process ignoring this phenomenon cannot be the basis for effective interaction with the environment.
Although research on animal models and experimental psychology indicates a critical time binding window as the basis for multimodal integration and an extensive network involving motor and non-motor areas has been studied, no clear evidence of the existence of neural circuits dedicated to time perception is available to date.

Physiopathological, structural ad functional data acquired from research on brain diseases affecting cerebellum, basal ganglia and fronto-parietal networks, as well as not invasive brain stimulation techniques can be used as empirical models to shed light on the putative neural network for time perception. Similarly, computational models can be used to describe how the brain can estimate the duration of an event, when an event has occurred or when an event will take place. These models differ from those of other perceptual modalities because of the intrinsic and intangible nature of time. However, they still address similar issues such as accuracy, neural implementation and integration of disparate stimuli containing temporal information.

In this Research Topic, we aim to collect experimental contributions and review articles
addressing both the role of timing for brain function and the specular perspective on how brain generates timing.
Therefore, we are welcoming contributions about these topics ranging from preclinical studies on cells or animal models to human and computational models concerning both healthy and/or neurologically or psychiatrically impaired people.


Keywords: Time perception, Neural code, Temporal binding window (TBW), Timing, Multimodal integration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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