Research Topic

Advances in Human Immune System (HIS) Mouse Models for Studying Human Hematopoiesis and Cancer Immunotherapy

About this Research Topic

Gaining knowledge of human physiology and pathophysiology is often hampered by restricted access to human tissues or limited to performing in-vitro assays. Furthermore, the development of novel therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy, autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases is tightly restricted by the use of human samples before moving to clinical trials, which is generally slow and costly.

Human Immune System (HIS) mice - immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human immune system – offer the unique opportunity to comprehensively study human infectious disease, hematopoiesis, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity in vivo. Recent progress in HIS mouse models, in which recipient immunodeficient mice carry several gene mutations or express human cytokines and self-recognition molecules, have improved human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell engraftment as well as functional immune cell development in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. These advanced HIS models may allow us to more precisely characterize human hematopoiesis as well as the human immune response against cancer than previous in vivo models.

However, several critical issues remain in current HIS mouse models:
1) Suboptimal thymopoiesis, insufficient proper selection of human T lymphocytes, as well as limited MHC-restricted immune responses in the periphery
2) Lack of mature human B lymphocyte differentiation
3) Inefficient migration of human immune cells into secondary lymphoid and into non-lymphoid tissues (such as the intestine)
4) Poor development of human erythrocytes and platelets
5) Unclear role of human innate immune cells (such as tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells) and their crosstalk with adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment
6) Heterogeneous engraftment potential of patient-derived tumor cells
7) Lack of well-characterized human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche

In addition, whilst many types of HIS mice are now available, it is unclear which specific HIS mouse model is most suitable for a specific research area/question.
The current Research Topic calls for the submission of Original Research and Review articles that focus on:
• The development and refinement of HIS mouse models, which can be used to study human hematopoiesis (both normal and malignant) as well as human immune responses to cancer
• Assessing the effects of cancer immunotherapies using HIS mouse models
• Comparing different HIS mouse models in the context of tumor development and functional immune response against cancer
• Characterization of the human HSC niche in HIS mice


Keywords: humanized mice, xenograft, human immune system, hematopoiesis, cancer immunotherapy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Gaining knowledge of human physiology and pathophysiology is often hampered by restricted access to human tissues or limited to performing in-vitro assays. Furthermore, the development of novel therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy, autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases is tightly restricted by the use of human samples before moving to clinical trials, which is generally slow and costly.

Human Immune System (HIS) mice - immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human immune system – offer the unique opportunity to comprehensively study human infectious disease, hematopoiesis, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity in vivo. Recent progress in HIS mouse models, in which recipient immunodeficient mice carry several gene mutations or express human cytokines and self-recognition molecules, have improved human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell engraftment as well as functional immune cell development in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. These advanced HIS models may allow us to more precisely characterize human hematopoiesis as well as the human immune response against cancer than previous in vivo models.

However, several critical issues remain in current HIS mouse models:
1) Suboptimal thymopoiesis, insufficient proper selection of human T lymphocytes, as well as limited MHC-restricted immune responses in the periphery
2) Lack of mature human B lymphocyte differentiation
3) Inefficient migration of human immune cells into secondary lymphoid and into non-lymphoid tissues (such as the intestine)
4) Poor development of human erythrocytes and platelets
5) Unclear role of human innate immune cells (such as tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells) and their crosstalk with adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment
6) Heterogeneous engraftment potential of patient-derived tumor cells
7) Lack of well-characterized human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche

In addition, whilst many types of HIS mice are now available, it is unclear which specific HIS mouse model is most suitable for a specific research area/question.
The current Research Topic calls for the submission of Original Research and Review articles that focus on:
• The development and refinement of HIS mouse models, which can be used to study human hematopoiesis (both normal and malignant) as well as human immune responses to cancer
• Assessing the effects of cancer immunotherapies using HIS mouse models
• Comparing different HIS mouse models in the context of tumor development and functional immune response against cancer
• Characterization of the human HSC niche in HIS mice


Keywords: humanized mice, xenograft, human immune system, hematopoiesis, cancer immunotherapy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..