Research Topic

Effects of Different Light Spectra on Secondary/Specialized Metabolite Accumulation and Plant Resistance Mechanisms

About this Research Topic

Light triggers a wide range of signals for morphogenesis and other physiological processes. Different characteristics of light, such as spectral composition (wavelengths), intensity, source, duration, and direction can influence plant growth, development, and resistance mechanisms. These inputs are sensed by special photoreceptors in the light spectrum UV-A, UV-B, red, and blue. The proportion of wavelengths supplied to plants, as well as intensity, completely changes photomorphogenic outcomes, as well as primary and secondary (specialized) metabolites, such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, phenolics, and glucosinolates. Increasing light intensity is known to induce the production of various secondary/specialized metabolites in plants as a form of protection. Here , light with shorter wave length such as UV and blue, are the most powerful influence on secondary/specialized metabolism, relative to other wavelengths at the same intensity.

The rapid development of lighting technologies using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has caused an increase in the application of this technology for horticulture cultivation systems. Using LED units might be both energy saving and beneficial to plants than traditional high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps, but the design of light modules needs to be developed in terms of dynamic light level and spectral composition. In general, light, but especially UV-A and UV-B irradiation, has emerged as a key modulator of plant immunity. However, the beneficial effects of light on plant resistance to pests and disease have been often unappreciated. Although partial mechanisms of plant responses to light quality are reported, yet how plants orchestrate these, and the impacts on the levels of above- and below-ground tissues (including molecular, physiological, and morphological processes), remains unclear. To gain more insight into the effects of different light spectra on plant physiological processes, including resistance mechanisms, this Research Topic is envisioned to bond the state of the art conclusive for the research community.

Submissions are welcomed that cover:
- Effects of light spectra on secondary/specialized metabolites (plant quality with respect to human health and immunity)
- Sensing light and plant resistance mechanisms studies against insects and pathogens under different light conditions, including UV-A/B
- Light application technologies in horticulture, solutions, and appropriate measurement techniques


Keywords: Plant resistance, UV light, LED light, light application techniques, Secondary metabolism, Specialized metabolism


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Light triggers a wide range of signals for morphogenesis and other physiological processes. Different characteristics of light, such as spectral composition (wavelengths), intensity, source, duration, and direction can influence plant growth, development, and resistance mechanisms. These inputs are sensed by special photoreceptors in the light spectrum UV-A, UV-B, red, and blue. The proportion of wavelengths supplied to plants, as well as intensity, completely changes photomorphogenic outcomes, as well as primary and secondary (specialized) metabolites, such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, phenolics, and glucosinolates. Increasing light intensity is known to induce the production of various secondary/specialized metabolites in plants as a form of protection. Here , light with shorter wave length such as UV and blue, are the most powerful influence on secondary/specialized metabolism, relative to other wavelengths at the same intensity.

The rapid development of lighting technologies using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has caused an increase in the application of this technology for horticulture cultivation systems. Using LED units might be both energy saving and beneficial to plants than traditional high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps, but the design of light modules needs to be developed in terms of dynamic light level and spectral composition. In general, light, but especially UV-A and UV-B irradiation, has emerged as a key modulator of plant immunity. However, the beneficial effects of light on plant resistance to pests and disease have been often unappreciated. Although partial mechanisms of plant responses to light quality are reported, yet how plants orchestrate these, and the impacts on the levels of above- and below-ground tissues (including molecular, physiological, and morphological processes), remains unclear. To gain more insight into the effects of different light spectra on plant physiological processes, including resistance mechanisms, this Research Topic is envisioned to bond the state of the art conclusive for the research community.

Submissions are welcomed that cover:
- Effects of light spectra on secondary/specialized metabolites (plant quality with respect to human health and immunity)
- Sensing light and plant resistance mechanisms studies against insects and pathogens under different light conditions, including UV-A/B
- Light application technologies in horticulture, solutions, and appropriate measurement techniques


Keywords: Plant resistance, UV light, LED light, light application techniques, Secondary metabolism, Specialized metabolism


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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