Research Topic

Morphogenic Cascades underlying Regeneration and Plasticity after Nervous System Injury

About this Research Topic

The nervous system is highly vulnerable to various internal and external factors which could lead to acute or chronic neurodegeneration. The morphological basis of dysfunction after injury involves loss of integrity of the extracellular matrix, neuronal circuitry, and synaptic activity and plasticity. The primary injury enables a huge variety of developmentally-related biomolecules to stimulate the process of regeneration. Extracellular proteins, cell adhesion molecules, neurotrophic factors as well as different organic and inorganic compounds of the nervous tissue are necessary for recovery after injury. However, the secondary injury as well as further degeneration of the surrounding tissue, could be prevented by reactivation and recruitment of a plethora of cell signals, such as growth factors, neurotransmitters, extracellular matrix proteases, cell adhesion and recognition molecules.

At the core of the injury, neuronal damage appears to be often irreversible. In contrast, the damage of the tissue surrounding the primary injury locus (secondary damage) could be prevented, thus increasing the survival rates and improving life quality of the patients. Activation of cascades underlying reorganization of the extracellular matrix and stimulation of neuronal plasticity and activity by molecules that play essential roles early in nervous system development is a promising approach for treatment of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. Recent data suggest that various intrinsic transcription factors or extrinsic signals (e.g. growth factors) are involved in remodeling of the nervous tissue after injury. Additionally, extracellular matrix proteases processing receptors, such as cell recognition molecules of the neuronal surface, modulate synaptogenesis and plasticity during recovery. Neuropeptides, purinoreceptors and growth factors are not only essential during nervous system development but also in the process of prevention and recovery after injury where developmental processes are recapitulated.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover promising and novel research trends on signaling cascades underlying neurodegeneration and regeneration falling under the following points:

• Nociception
• Plasticity
• Transcription and neurotrophic factors
• Neurotransmitters
• Adult neurogenesis and synaptogenesis
• Gliogenesis
• Proteolysis
• Extracellular matrix molecules
• Therapeutic approaches
• Extra-, inter- and intra-cellular signaling

We welcome articles as Original Research, Reviews, Mini Reviews, Methods, Clinical Trial, Opinion and General Commentary.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The nervous system is highly vulnerable to various internal and external factors which could lead to acute or chronic neurodegeneration. The morphological basis of dysfunction after injury involves loss of integrity of the extracellular matrix, neuronal circuitry, and synaptic activity and plasticity. The primary injury enables a huge variety of developmentally-related biomolecules to stimulate the process of regeneration. Extracellular proteins, cell adhesion molecules, neurotrophic factors as well as different organic and inorganic compounds of the nervous tissue are necessary for recovery after injury. However, the secondary injury as well as further degeneration of the surrounding tissue, could be prevented by reactivation and recruitment of a plethora of cell signals, such as growth factors, neurotransmitters, extracellular matrix proteases, cell adhesion and recognition molecules.

At the core of the injury, neuronal damage appears to be often irreversible. In contrast, the damage of the tissue surrounding the primary injury locus (secondary damage) could be prevented, thus increasing the survival rates and improving life quality of the patients. Activation of cascades underlying reorganization of the extracellular matrix and stimulation of neuronal plasticity and activity by molecules that play essential roles early in nervous system development is a promising approach for treatment of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. Recent data suggest that various intrinsic transcription factors or extrinsic signals (e.g. growth factors) are involved in remodeling of the nervous tissue after injury. Additionally, extracellular matrix proteases processing receptors, such as cell recognition molecules of the neuronal surface, modulate synaptogenesis and plasticity during recovery. Neuropeptides, purinoreceptors and growth factors are not only essential during nervous system development but also in the process of prevention and recovery after injury where developmental processes are recapitulated.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover promising and novel research trends on signaling cascades underlying neurodegeneration and regeneration falling under the following points:

• Nociception
• Plasticity
• Transcription and neurotrophic factors
• Neurotransmitters
• Adult neurogenesis and synaptogenesis
• Gliogenesis
• Proteolysis
• Extracellular matrix molecules
• Therapeutic approaches
• Extra-, inter- and intra-cellular signaling

We welcome articles as Original Research, Reviews, Mini Reviews, Methods, Clinical Trial, Opinion and General Commentary.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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