Research Topic

Epigenetic Regulation of Innate Immunity

About this Research Topic

Epigenetic regulation of immune cells is critical in controlling their functions in health and disease. Recent advances are showing that epigenetics is key to the define the cellular phenotype also for innate immune cells, particularly monocytes and macrophages. As a matter of fact, an aberrant remodelling of macrophage responses can lead to an increase in the number of proinflammatory macrophages during diabetes mellitus or an increase in anti-inflammatory macrophages during cancer. Analogously, dysregulation of transcriptional and epigenetic programs in macrophages has been shown to contribute to atherosclerosis’ onset and development. Various factors contribute to epigenetic changes in innate immune cells, including external stimuli and cellular metabolic shift. Moreover, pharmacological interventions into the epigenetic machinery are emerging as new therapeutics to treat inflammation-associated diseases. The emerging roles of epigenetics in controlling innate immunity add another layer of complexity in the regulation of the first line defense.

With the current Research Topic we aim to provide an overview of the current advances in the study of the epigenetic regulation in innate immune cells, with a particular focus on monocytes and macrophages. Since the field advances rapidly, with our collection we would like to narrow the knowledge gap existing in the study of epigenetic landscapes in different innate immune contexts, with a focus on its stability, regulatory mechanisms and its relevance to human health and disease. We welcome timely Reviews and Mini-Reviews and, particularly, Original Research articles covering the following subtopics:

• Epigenetic enzymes controlling the transcriptional machinery in innate immune cells
• Epigenetic regulation in subsets of innate immune cells in disease settings
• Metabolic processes linked to epigenetics in innate immune cells
• Manipulating epigenetics in innate immune cells for therapeutic application

These studies may cover investigations into fundamental regulatory mechanisms of the epigenetic machinery using either in vitro approaches or animal and human studies in relation to diseases. This will help to clarify and update the current picture of this important regulatory node of the innate immune response


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Epigenetic regulation of immune cells is critical in controlling their functions in health and disease. Recent advances are showing that epigenetics is key to the define the cellular phenotype also for innate immune cells, particularly monocytes and macrophages. As a matter of fact, an aberrant remodelling of macrophage responses can lead to an increase in the number of proinflammatory macrophages during diabetes mellitus or an increase in anti-inflammatory macrophages during cancer. Analogously, dysregulation of transcriptional and epigenetic programs in macrophages has been shown to contribute to atherosclerosis’ onset and development. Various factors contribute to epigenetic changes in innate immune cells, including external stimuli and cellular metabolic shift. Moreover, pharmacological interventions into the epigenetic machinery are emerging as new therapeutics to treat inflammation-associated diseases. The emerging roles of epigenetics in controlling innate immunity add another layer of complexity in the regulation of the first line defense.

With the current Research Topic we aim to provide an overview of the current advances in the study of the epigenetic regulation in innate immune cells, with a particular focus on monocytes and macrophages. Since the field advances rapidly, with our collection we would like to narrow the knowledge gap existing in the study of epigenetic landscapes in different innate immune contexts, with a focus on its stability, regulatory mechanisms and its relevance to human health and disease. We welcome timely Reviews and Mini-Reviews and, particularly, Original Research articles covering the following subtopics:

• Epigenetic enzymes controlling the transcriptional machinery in innate immune cells
• Epigenetic regulation in subsets of innate immune cells in disease settings
• Metabolic processes linked to epigenetics in innate immune cells
• Manipulating epigenetics in innate immune cells for therapeutic application

These studies may cover investigations into fundamental regulatory mechanisms of the epigenetic machinery using either in vitro approaches or animal and human studies in relation to diseases. This will help to clarify and update the current picture of this important regulatory node of the innate immune response


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

14 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

14 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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