Research Topic

Bridging Science and Policy for Surveillance, Economics and Social Sciences: ICAHS & ISESSAH 2020

About this Research Topic

African swine fever, antimicrobial resistance and the release of zoonotic pathogens from food systems are examples of three global challenges in animal health, which are currently threatening the world. These hazards are associated with significant economic, societal and food security issues for a growing number of countries. The movement of people, animals and food has increased to a point where major disease events are occurring with increased frequency, challenging our ability to manage these problems in a timely and proportionate manner. Until better animal health surveillance and associated response measures are adequately resourced, the challenge society faces will continue to grow. The current COVID 19 situation indicates that simply acting on emergence and release is not appropriate, more attention needs to be made to prevention.
In the process of preventing and mitigating the risks and impacts of these challenges, surveillance is a key element. It enables an understanding of the actions needed – for example, why and where actions are required. Moreover, sociological and economic factors play a role in how such actions are conducted. All of these factors have an influence on the efficacy of these actions in relation to prevention and control.
The solutions to be chosen are not static, because they are influenced by the societies affected and their associated side-effects such as on trade and food security. Moreover, what is considered feasible in one country might not be feasible in another country or considered worth doing by decision-makers, because other surveillance options or challenges are perceived as more important. Learning from and sharing each other’s experiences are therefore pivotal for successful control and mitigation. Hence, the actors involved in surveillance and control – whether they are affiliated with government authorities, academia or livestock industries – need to meet to be able to collaborate effectively.
The ICAHS4 conference together with the ISESSAH conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November 2020, provides such an opportunity for learning and sharing between researchers, representatives of the food supply chain, authorities, as well as people working for international organizations within food safety and security, and animal health. In the future, this may result into the development of new ways of collaboration such as through Public-Private-Partnerships and interdisciplinary approaches. Much can probably be obtained through such alternative governance models – if people know how to do it.
The purpose of this Research Topic is to share the latest experiences in novel research within surveillance for animal health and food safety and security, presented at the ICAHS4 and ISSESSAH conferences. The areas covered include the following topics, identified by the international Scientific Committee for the ICAHS4 and ISESSAH conference:
- Integrating novel methods in surveillance
- Use of surveillance data
- Cross-sector surveillance – organization, collaboration and benefits
- Translating surveillance outcomes into policy, decisions and actions
- Costs and motivation
- Social science in the control of animal diseases
- Economic considerations in animal health

All speakers and poster authors of the ICAHS4 and ISESSAH are eligible for submitting a manuscript to this Research Topic. Contributions in the form of a full scientific manuscript (up to 12,000 words) are therefore welcome. Moreover, there is a possibility of submitting a Brief Research Report (up to 4,000 words) to the Research Topic.

Topic Editor Lis Alban works for an organization that gives advice to farmers and abattoirs. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Surveillance, methodology, animal health, food safety, decision-making, policy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

African swine fever, antimicrobial resistance and the release of zoonotic pathogens from food systems are examples of three global challenges in animal health, which are currently threatening the world. These hazards are associated with significant economic, societal and food security issues for a growing number of countries. The movement of people, animals and food has increased to a point where major disease events are occurring with increased frequency, challenging our ability to manage these problems in a timely and proportionate manner. Until better animal health surveillance and associated response measures are adequately resourced, the challenge society faces will continue to grow. The current COVID 19 situation indicates that simply acting on emergence and release is not appropriate, more attention needs to be made to prevention.
In the process of preventing and mitigating the risks and impacts of these challenges, surveillance is a key element. It enables an understanding of the actions needed – for example, why and where actions are required. Moreover, sociological and economic factors play a role in how such actions are conducted. All of these factors have an influence on the efficacy of these actions in relation to prevention and control.
The solutions to be chosen are not static, because they are influenced by the societies affected and their associated side-effects such as on trade and food security. Moreover, what is considered feasible in one country might not be feasible in another country or considered worth doing by decision-makers, because other surveillance options or challenges are perceived as more important. Learning from and sharing each other’s experiences are therefore pivotal for successful control and mitigation. Hence, the actors involved in surveillance and control – whether they are affiliated with government authorities, academia or livestock industries – need to meet to be able to collaborate effectively.
The ICAHS4 conference together with the ISESSAH conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November 2020, provides such an opportunity for learning and sharing between researchers, representatives of the food supply chain, authorities, as well as people working for international organizations within food safety and security, and animal health. In the future, this may result into the development of new ways of collaboration such as through Public-Private-Partnerships and interdisciplinary approaches. Much can probably be obtained through such alternative governance models – if people know how to do it.
The purpose of this Research Topic is to share the latest experiences in novel research within surveillance for animal health and food safety and security, presented at the ICAHS4 and ISSESSAH conferences. The areas covered include the following topics, identified by the international Scientific Committee for the ICAHS4 and ISESSAH conference:
- Integrating novel methods in surveillance
- Use of surveillance data
- Cross-sector surveillance – organization, collaboration and benefits
- Translating surveillance outcomes into policy, decisions and actions
- Costs and motivation
- Social science in the control of animal diseases
- Economic considerations in animal health

All speakers and poster authors of the ICAHS4 and ISESSAH are eligible for submitting a manuscript to this Research Topic. Contributions in the form of a full scientific manuscript (up to 12,000 words) are therefore welcome. Moreover, there is a possibility of submitting a Brief Research Report (up to 4,000 words) to the Research Topic.

Topic Editor Lis Alban works for an organization that gives advice to farmers and abattoirs. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Surveillance, methodology, animal health, food safety, decision-making, policy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..