Research Topic

Current Understanding of the Pathophysiology and Novel Treatment for Right Ventricle Failure in Adult and Pediatric Patients

About this Research Topic

Right ventricle failure (RVF) is a serious clinical problem when the right ventricle is unable to provide sufficient blood flow through the pulmonary circulation. The causes of RVF are diverse, varying from pressure overload to volume overload, from single ventricle disease to bi-ventricular diseases including left ventricle dysfunction, as well as from adult diseases (e.g, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathies, ischemia/infarction, arrhythmias) to congenital heart diseases (CHD) (e.g., after the Fontan procedure, tetralogy of Fallot or a ventricular septal defect). The significance of the right ventricle (RV) is evident by the fact that RV function is one of the most important predictors of mortality and morbidity in adult patients as well as patients with CHD.

Although originally known as the ‘forgotten chamber’, the right ventricle has received increasing attention in the past decade, and it is now accepted that mechanism of RVF is different than that of the left ventricle failure. However, the etiology/pathophysiology of the RVF is not completely understood. Currently, there are no effective therapies for RVF in both adult and pediatric patient populations.

Authors are welcome to submit original articles and reviews that seek to better characterize the pathophysiological of RV failure with various etiologies, as well as at different ages and sexes. Because of a lack of RV specific treatment for RVF, contributions investigating novel methodologies for therapeutic purposes of RVF at all levels (from the molecular and cellular level to organ level) are also welcome.

Potential themes of interest for this Research Topic include:
- Advances in understanding of the adaptation or maladaptation of the RVF induced by different pathologies in adult patients and in different sexes
- Advances in the understanding of, and therapies for, right sided or pulmonary dysfunction caused by structural congenital heart defects
- Clinical or preclinical studies on the pathophysiological mechanisms of RVF including fibrosis, arrhythmias, inflammation, cell-cell interaction (e.g., interaction between cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts)
- Clinical or preclinical studies on the novel treatment of RVF, such as those with regenerative and tissue engineering approaches
- Mechanobiology of the cardiopulmonary system involved in RVF development or recovery using experimental and/or computational approaches

Topic Editor Dr. Ankit Desai holds patents related to treatment and prevention of pulmonary hypertension and to diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Right ventricle failure (RVF) is a serious clinical problem when the right ventricle is unable to provide sufficient blood flow through the pulmonary circulation. The causes of RVF are diverse, varying from pressure overload to volume overload, from single ventricle disease to bi-ventricular diseases including left ventricle dysfunction, as well as from adult diseases (e.g, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathies, ischemia/infarction, arrhythmias) to congenital heart diseases (CHD) (e.g., after the Fontan procedure, tetralogy of Fallot or a ventricular septal defect). The significance of the right ventricle (RV) is evident by the fact that RV function is one of the most important predictors of mortality and morbidity in adult patients as well as patients with CHD.

Although originally known as the ‘forgotten chamber’, the right ventricle has received increasing attention in the past decade, and it is now accepted that mechanism of RVF is different than that of the left ventricle failure. However, the etiology/pathophysiology of the RVF is not completely understood. Currently, there are no effective therapies for RVF in both adult and pediatric patient populations.

Authors are welcome to submit original articles and reviews that seek to better characterize the pathophysiological of RV failure with various etiologies, as well as at different ages and sexes. Because of a lack of RV specific treatment for RVF, contributions investigating novel methodologies for therapeutic purposes of RVF at all levels (from the molecular and cellular level to organ level) are also welcome.

Potential themes of interest for this Research Topic include:
- Advances in understanding of the adaptation or maladaptation of the RVF induced by different pathologies in adult patients and in different sexes
- Advances in the understanding of, and therapies for, right sided or pulmonary dysfunction caused by structural congenital heart defects
- Clinical or preclinical studies on the pathophysiological mechanisms of RVF including fibrosis, arrhythmias, inflammation, cell-cell interaction (e.g., interaction between cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts)
- Clinical or preclinical studies on the novel treatment of RVF, such as those with regenerative and tissue engineering approaches
- Mechanobiology of the cardiopulmonary system involved in RVF development or recovery using experimental and/or computational approaches

Topic Editor Dr. Ankit Desai holds patents related to treatment and prevention of pulmonary hypertension and to diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2020 Abstract
15 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2020 Abstract
15 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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