Research Topic

Malaria Targeting Toolkit: Host-Parasite Interaction

About this Research Topic

Malaria is caused by intracellular parasite Plasmodium and is transmitted by the bite of an infected Anopheline mosquito. Despite decades of collective efforts worldwide, malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious diseases with more than half of the world’s population at risk of infection and ...

Malaria is caused by intracellular parasite Plasmodium and is transmitted by the bite of an infected Anopheline mosquito. Despite decades of collective efforts worldwide, malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious diseases with more than half of the world’s population at risk of infection and nearly half a million-annual deaths. The symptoms of a malarial infection, ranging from headache to severe complications, including severe anemia, cerebral malaria, acute respiratory distress symptoms and pregnancy-associated malaria. Both host and parasite factors, including host genetic background, parasite species or stains, even within-host selection, influence the clinical outcomes of malaria. In the battle to eradicate malaria, knowledge into the intricate host-parasite interaction will be instrumental in developing new and more effective antimalarial therapy, drug and vaccines.

In this Research Topic, we aim to provide new insights into the complex interplay between parasite and host responses during a liver or blood stage malarial infection, including key parasite or host molecules that are interacting with each other, or that are critically influencing the infection outcome. We welcome the submission of Original Research and Review Articles, of the following topics (but not limited to):

1. Development of drugs, vaccines or immunotherapies targeting host-parasite interaction
2. System analysis profiling of dynamic changes of the parasite or host tissues/cells during liver or blood-stage infection
3. Parasite virulence molecules or immune processes involved in parasite sequestration/retention and associated to organ damage
4. Immuno-pathology evoked by parasite molecules or dysregulated immune responses
5. Mechanisms of immune modulation or evasion induced by the parasite
6. Parasite recognition or killing mediated by host immune cells


Keywords: Malaria, Novel Drug Development, Immune Response Modulation, Parasite Virulence Molecules


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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