Research Topic

Apoptosis and Senescence in Vertebrate Development

About this Research Topic

In vertebrate embryos, spatiotemporally regulated apoptosis is a characteristic feature of most organ anlagen. However, despite this frequent relationship with key steps of development, e.g., neurulation, it is not yet fully resolved in many cases: (1) which cell types undergo apoptosis; (2) what in essence are the developmental functions of apoptosis; (3) how apoptosis is regulated, and (4) whether identical, similar or different patterns of apoptosis exist in different vertebrate species or classes.

Contrary to the situation with apoptosis, developmental senescence has been dis¬covered only a few years ago. But one thing is certain already: developmental senescence often occurs in close spatio-temporal proximity to apoptosis. We are therefore confident that combined analyses of these two critical players will help to better understand the associated key steps of development. Hence, the first objective of our Research Topic is to encourage novel approaches towards identifying the exact patterns of both developmental apoptosis and senescence in vertebrates.

Special attention will be paid to signaling centers that appear to be preferred subjects to senescence-associated modulation, as revealed by the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) of limbs. In this context, we are particularly interested to learn whether and how replicatively arrested senescent cells are capable of putting secretory activities into signaling operations.

Another relevant objective of this Research Topic is to identify crosstalk and functional interactions between developmental senescence and apoptosis. Focus will be given to experimental approaches that at¬tempt to assess whether developmental apoptosis and senescence (1) affect identical or different cell populations, (2) contribute to identical, non-identical, consecutive or non-consecutive developmental steps, (3) compensate for each other or behave complementary, (4) jointly or separately may cause or prevent congenital diseases and malformations, and (5) are regulated independently or coordinately.

This Research Topic aims to showcase different perspectives and areas to explore developmental apoptosis and senescence with basic to cutting-edge research. In addition, building bridges between developmental biology and regenerative medicine is highly desirable. We welcome articles as Original Research, Reviews, Systematic Reviews and Mini Reviews.


Keywords: Apoptosis, Autophagy, Necrosis, Macrophages, Senescence


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In vertebrate embryos, spatiotemporally regulated apoptosis is a characteristic feature of most organ anlagen. However, despite this frequent relationship with key steps of development, e.g., neurulation, it is not yet fully resolved in many cases: (1) which cell types undergo apoptosis; (2) what in essence are the developmental functions of apoptosis; (3) how apoptosis is regulated, and (4) whether identical, similar or different patterns of apoptosis exist in different vertebrate species or classes.

Contrary to the situation with apoptosis, developmental senescence has been dis¬covered only a few years ago. But one thing is certain already: developmental senescence often occurs in close spatio-temporal proximity to apoptosis. We are therefore confident that combined analyses of these two critical players will help to better understand the associated key steps of development. Hence, the first objective of our Research Topic is to encourage novel approaches towards identifying the exact patterns of both developmental apoptosis and senescence in vertebrates.

Special attention will be paid to signaling centers that appear to be preferred subjects to senescence-associated modulation, as revealed by the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) of limbs. In this context, we are particularly interested to learn whether and how replicatively arrested senescent cells are capable of putting secretory activities into signaling operations.

Another relevant objective of this Research Topic is to identify crosstalk and functional interactions between developmental senescence and apoptosis. Focus will be given to experimental approaches that at¬tempt to assess whether developmental apoptosis and senescence (1) affect identical or different cell populations, (2) contribute to identical, non-identical, consecutive or non-consecutive developmental steps, (3) compensate for each other or behave complementary, (4) jointly or separately may cause or prevent congenital diseases and malformations, and (5) are regulated independently or coordinately.

This Research Topic aims to showcase different perspectives and areas to explore developmental apoptosis and senescence with basic to cutting-edge research. In addition, building bridges between developmental biology and regenerative medicine is highly desirable. We welcome articles as Original Research, Reviews, Systematic Reviews and Mini Reviews.


Keywords: Apoptosis, Autophagy, Necrosis, Macrophages, Senescence


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

20 July 2020 Abstract
30 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

20 July 2020 Abstract
30 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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