Research Topic

Insights Into Acute Leukemia Research: Genetic Predisposition and Mechanisms of Relapse

About this Research Topic

In recent years numerous studies have been focused on the genomic analysis of acute leukemias with the purpose to improve the biology of these diseases and to identify key alterations relevant for diagnosis, risk stratification, prognosis and relapse.These studies revolutionized our understanding of leukemia, leading to the definition of novel leukemia subgroups harboring genomic aberrations with a peculiar age-related distribution and a prognostic significance.

Noteworthy, some of these researches revealed the sequential order the genetic mutations occur and the clonal contribution of these mutations to leukemia predisposition, onset and relapse. For both lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, there are key mutations that contribute to a pre-leukemic background, and further subclonal lesions and/or epigenetic events that lead to full leukemic transformation. Importantly, several mutations can occur before birth and increase the susceptibility to leukemias. In addition, inherited genetic variation affects both leukemia predisposition and drug responsiveness. Besides leukemia onset, the sequential acquisition of genetic and epigenetic alterations might affect leukemia prognosis. Indeed, multiple subclones exist in parallel, and the clonal expansion of those cells which survive during treatment contributes to leukemia transformation and relapse.

With this Research Topic, we aim to provide an extensive overview of the recently identified acute leukemia predisposing conditions along with the potential consequences for diagnosis and treatment of preleukemic clones.

We welcome Original Research, Review and Mini-review articles related to, but not limited to the following topics:
- the longitudinal genomic characterization of both myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms.
- the clonal genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of acute leukemias including single-cell studies.
- the epistatic interactions between alterations promoting acute leukemia onset and those responsible for relapse.
- the role of inherited genetic variation in predisposition to acute leukemias.


Keywords: Myeloid and lymphoid leukemias, clonal evolution, genetic predisposition, genetic mutations, epigenetics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In recent years numerous studies have been focused on the genomic analysis of acute leukemias with the purpose to improve the biology of these diseases and to identify key alterations relevant for diagnosis, risk stratification, prognosis and relapse.These studies revolutionized our understanding of leukemia, leading to the definition of novel leukemia subgroups harboring genomic aberrations with a peculiar age-related distribution and a prognostic significance.

Noteworthy, some of these researches revealed the sequential order the genetic mutations occur and the clonal contribution of these mutations to leukemia predisposition, onset and relapse. For both lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, there are key mutations that contribute to a pre-leukemic background, and further subclonal lesions and/or epigenetic events that lead to full leukemic transformation. Importantly, several mutations can occur before birth and increase the susceptibility to leukemias. In addition, inherited genetic variation affects both leukemia predisposition and drug responsiveness. Besides leukemia onset, the sequential acquisition of genetic and epigenetic alterations might affect leukemia prognosis. Indeed, multiple subclones exist in parallel, and the clonal expansion of those cells which survive during treatment contributes to leukemia transformation and relapse.

With this Research Topic, we aim to provide an extensive overview of the recently identified acute leukemia predisposing conditions along with the potential consequences for diagnosis and treatment of preleukemic clones.

We welcome Original Research, Review and Mini-review articles related to, but not limited to the following topics:
- the longitudinal genomic characterization of both myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms.
- the clonal genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of acute leukemias including single-cell studies.
- the epistatic interactions between alterations promoting acute leukemia onset and those responsible for relapse.
- the role of inherited genetic variation in predisposition to acute leukemias.


Keywords: Myeloid and lymphoid leukemias, clonal evolution, genetic predisposition, genetic mutations, epigenetics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

19 July 2020 Abstract
16 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

19 July 2020 Abstract
16 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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