Research Topic

Epidemiology and Genetics of Vestibular Disorders

About this Research Topic

Vestibular disorders include a heterogeneous set of common and rare conditions, such as peripheral and central vestibular disorders and an ultra-rare and large group of cerebellar disorders. A familial clustering suggests a genetic contribution in most of these disorders, including motion sickness, vestibular migraine, Meniere disease, spinocerebellar and episodic ataxias. However, a better clinical characterization is needed to define partial syndromes and symptom overlap occurring in individuals with a vestibular episodic syndrome and those with peripheral and central bilateral vestibular loss. Moreover, cellular and animal models of vestibular disorders are needed to carry out functional validation of candidate genes.

The goal of this Research Topic is to promote the epidemiological studies aiming to decipher the genetic contribution to any vestibular disorder. The Research Topic will cover epidemiological, clinical and genetic studies that may add new information on the phenotype, prevalence or genetic information, and improve our understanding of vestibular and cerebellar disorders. Prevalence studies across different regions or countries worldwide are considered as a first step to estimate the enrichment of rare variation in different populations. Deep phenotyping of any of these conditions in large case-series, cross-sectional studies, or cohort studies may help to define subgroups of patients for future genomic studies.

Therefore for this Research Topic we welcome the following:

• Epidemiological studies on vestibular migraine, motion sickness, Meniere disease, BPPV or episodic ataxias, that may help to define endophenotypes that can improve clinical knowledge;
• Cross-sectional studies investigating co-morbidities in vestibular disorders;
• Family-based studies using exome or genome sequencing to describe allelic variants or genes involved in peripheral or central vestibular disorders in multiplex individuals with sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular symptoms;
• Twin-based studies for any vestibular disorder supporting a genetic contribution;
• Animal or cellular models aiming to validate candidate genes for vestibular disorders;
• Systematic reviews on any vestibular or cerebellar condition showing genetic contribution.


Keywords: Vestibular disorders, genetics, epidemiology, ataxia, nystagmus


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Vestibular disorders include a heterogeneous set of common and rare conditions, such as peripheral and central vestibular disorders and an ultra-rare and large group of cerebellar disorders. A familial clustering suggests a genetic contribution in most of these disorders, including motion sickness, vestibular migraine, Meniere disease, spinocerebellar and episodic ataxias. However, a better clinical characterization is needed to define partial syndromes and symptom overlap occurring in individuals with a vestibular episodic syndrome and those with peripheral and central bilateral vestibular loss. Moreover, cellular and animal models of vestibular disorders are needed to carry out functional validation of candidate genes.

The goal of this Research Topic is to promote the epidemiological studies aiming to decipher the genetic contribution to any vestibular disorder. The Research Topic will cover epidemiological, clinical and genetic studies that may add new information on the phenotype, prevalence or genetic information, and improve our understanding of vestibular and cerebellar disorders. Prevalence studies across different regions or countries worldwide are considered as a first step to estimate the enrichment of rare variation in different populations. Deep phenotyping of any of these conditions in large case-series, cross-sectional studies, or cohort studies may help to define subgroups of patients for future genomic studies.

Therefore for this Research Topic we welcome the following:

• Epidemiological studies on vestibular migraine, motion sickness, Meniere disease, BPPV or episodic ataxias, that may help to define endophenotypes that can improve clinical knowledge;
• Cross-sectional studies investigating co-morbidities in vestibular disorders;
• Family-based studies using exome or genome sequencing to describe allelic variants or genes involved in peripheral or central vestibular disorders in multiplex individuals with sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular symptoms;
• Twin-based studies for any vestibular disorder supporting a genetic contribution;
• Animal or cellular models aiming to validate candidate genes for vestibular disorders;
• Systematic reviews on any vestibular or cerebellar condition showing genetic contribution.


Keywords: Vestibular disorders, genetics, epidemiology, ataxia, nystagmus


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Abstract
23 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Abstract
23 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..