Research Topic

Biology and Management of Weeds and Invasive Plant Species under Changing Climatic and Management Regimes

About this Research Topic

The global climate is changing at a rapid pace. Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), erratic precipitation, extreme weather events and warmer temperatures all have drastic effects on the biology and distribution of plant species. Significant effort has so far focused on the effects of climate change on growth, development and productivity of major crops and their pathogens and insect pests. In comparison, less information has been documented on such aspects for weeds and invasive plant species, and on the agricultural management of these issues. However, there is clear evidence that climate change and severe weather events have impacts on the biology, distribution, dispersal, interference potential and management of several weeds and invasive plant species, in both natural and managed ecosystems. In addition, the increasing demand for food, feed and other agricultural commodities has significantly changed land use, crop production technologies, and pest management practices. These changes also have substantial effects on movement, persistence, phenology and management of weeds and invasive plant species. Changes in climate and management regimes are often in concert, making the combined effects more pronounced.

This Research Topic aims to gather research outlining the actual and potential impacts of changing climates and management regimes on the biology and management of weeds and invasive plant species. Some of the major aspects of this topic may include but are not limited to:

• Effect of climate change elements (elevated CO2, high temperature/heat stress, drought and/or their interactions) on germination ecology, phenology, physiological functions, competition ability, allelopathic potential, fecundity, seed/propagule dispersal, seed bank dynamics, and management (herbicide efficacy, herbicide resistance, biological control or physical control) of weeds and invasive plant species
• Effect of changes in land use, production systems or pest management practices (e.g. transition from conventional to no-till systems) on the above-mentioned aspects of weed biology and management

This Research Topic will advance our understanding of the actual impact of changing selection pressures (due to climate and management changes) on weed biology, evolution and management. This knowledge will assist weed scientists, agronomists, rangers and ecologists to devise innovative management strategies that are able to negotiate these drastic changes for sustainable crop production, safe environment and stable ecosystems. Reviews, Original Research, Methods, Perspectives, and Opinion Articles are all welcome for submission.


Keywords: Climate change, Global change, Weed biology, Weed management, Integrated Weed Management (IWM), Invasive plant species, Biological invasions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The global climate is changing at a rapid pace. Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), erratic precipitation, extreme weather events and warmer temperatures all have drastic effects on the biology and distribution of plant species. Significant effort has so far focused on the effects of climate change on growth, development and productivity of major crops and their pathogens and insect pests. In comparison, less information has been documented on such aspects for weeds and invasive plant species, and on the agricultural management of these issues. However, there is clear evidence that climate change and severe weather events have impacts on the biology, distribution, dispersal, interference potential and management of several weeds and invasive plant species, in both natural and managed ecosystems. In addition, the increasing demand for food, feed and other agricultural commodities has significantly changed land use, crop production technologies, and pest management practices. These changes also have substantial effects on movement, persistence, phenology and management of weeds and invasive plant species. Changes in climate and management regimes are often in concert, making the combined effects more pronounced.

This Research Topic aims to gather research outlining the actual and potential impacts of changing climates and management regimes on the biology and management of weeds and invasive plant species. Some of the major aspects of this topic may include but are not limited to:

• Effect of climate change elements (elevated CO2, high temperature/heat stress, drought and/or their interactions) on germination ecology, phenology, physiological functions, competition ability, allelopathic potential, fecundity, seed/propagule dispersal, seed bank dynamics, and management (herbicide efficacy, herbicide resistance, biological control or physical control) of weeds and invasive plant species
• Effect of changes in land use, production systems or pest management practices (e.g. transition from conventional to no-till systems) on the above-mentioned aspects of weed biology and management

This Research Topic will advance our understanding of the actual impact of changing selection pressures (due to climate and management changes) on weed biology, evolution and management. This knowledge will assist weed scientists, agronomists, rangers and ecologists to devise innovative management strategies that are able to negotiate these drastic changes for sustainable crop production, safe environment and stable ecosystems. Reviews, Original Research, Methods, Perspectives, and Opinion Articles are all welcome for submission.


Keywords: Climate change, Global change, Weed biology, Weed management, Integrated Weed Management (IWM), Invasive plant species, Biological invasions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

26 June 2020 Abstract
23 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

26 June 2020 Abstract
23 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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