Research Topic

The Role of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Couple Infertility

About this Research Topic

Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) approximately affect 25% of the world’s western population, with the biggest increases occurring in young adults. The mechanisms through which obesity and MetS affect reproductive functions have not been well studied. Clinical studies and experimental models demonstrate that obesity and MetS alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, affecting sex steroid hormone production, and the quality and function of gametes. Most of the effects seem to occur by a number of mechanisms linked by reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress.

This Research Topic updates the current knowledge of the impact of obesity and MetS on several aspects that control reproductive functions, transgenerational effects, and therapies that can prevent/cure the two conditions (i.e. lifestyle modifications). In particular, the Research Topic will focus on the effects of obesity, MetS, and their interventions on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, gamete production and function, and natural and assisted reproduction outcomes.

Potential sub-topics may include original research and reviews articles covering but not limited to:
• Obesity and MetS and Hypothalamic/pituitary function
• Obesity and MetS and Sex steroid hormones
• Obesity and MetS and Testicular function
• Obesity and MetS and Ovarian function
• Obesity and MetS and alterations of the male genital tract (i.e. erectile dysfunction)
• Obesity and MetS and alterations of the female genital tract (i.e. anovulation, PCOS)
• Obesity and MetS and alterations of semen and egg quality
• Effects of Obesity and MetS on Natural fertility
• Effects of Obesity and MetS on Assisted reproduction outcomes


Keywords: obesity, metabolic syndrome, infertility, reproduction, spermatozoa


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) approximately affect 25% of the world’s western population, with the biggest increases occurring in young adults. The mechanisms through which obesity and MetS affect reproductive functions have not been well studied. Clinical studies and experimental models demonstrate that obesity and MetS alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, affecting sex steroid hormone production, and the quality and function of gametes. Most of the effects seem to occur by a number of mechanisms linked by reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress.

This Research Topic updates the current knowledge of the impact of obesity and MetS on several aspects that control reproductive functions, transgenerational effects, and therapies that can prevent/cure the two conditions (i.e. lifestyle modifications). In particular, the Research Topic will focus on the effects of obesity, MetS, and their interventions on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, gamete production and function, and natural and assisted reproduction outcomes.

Potential sub-topics may include original research and reviews articles covering but not limited to:
• Obesity and MetS and Hypothalamic/pituitary function
• Obesity and MetS and Sex steroid hormones
• Obesity and MetS and Testicular function
• Obesity and MetS and Ovarian function
• Obesity and MetS and alterations of the male genital tract (i.e. erectile dysfunction)
• Obesity and MetS and alterations of the female genital tract (i.e. anovulation, PCOS)
• Obesity and MetS and alterations of semen and egg quality
• Effects of Obesity and MetS on Natural fertility
• Effects of Obesity and MetS on Assisted reproduction outcomes


Keywords: obesity, metabolic syndrome, infertility, reproduction, spermatozoa


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Abstract
29 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Abstract
29 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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