Research Topic

Social Inequality in Cancer Screening

About this Research Topic

It is generally known there is a so-called social gradient regarding health and health care, meaning that people who are worst off socially and financially also have a worse health and do not get all the health care needed. Unfortunately, this link is also present regarding preventive health care. Several studies found that people with a low(er) socio-economic status (SES) take part less in cancer screening. However, there is a lot of evidence that screening programs for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer lead to a decrease in cause-specific mortality. The lower participation rate of specific subgroups in society is worrisome for several reasons. Firstly, people with a lower SES often also have a higher risk of getting cancer. This is the case for colorectal cancer and cervical cancer. Secondly, this also raises an ethical point: Can we tolerate that subgroups in society have a higher risk of dying from cancer, when it is preventable?

It is therefore important to have access to data on the participation of different societal subgroups in cancer screening; to analyze and interpret these data; to develop interventions to increase the participation rate in those subgroups participating less, and to evaluate these interventions.

Therefore, we are looking to receive manuscripts which describe the results of research on subgroups participating less in cancer screening programs; addressing, but not limited to, the following questions:
• What are the characteristics of subgroups participating less in cancer screening?
• What are the determinants of non-participation?
• What could make these subgroups willing to participate in the future?
• Which interventions have been developed to increase the participation rate in these subgroups?
• Which interventions worked, and which did not?

Although the screening programs on breast, cervical and colorectal cancer are generally the most widespread and considered as effective and efficient, we also welcome studies on other cancer screening programs.

Given the complex nature and comprehensiveness of the topic, it is obvious that a variety of research methods will be used. This means that studies using quantitative as well as studies using qualitative research methods are welcomed. We welcome all article types, including Systematic Reviews, Reviews and results of pilot programs can be accepted; however, the manuscripts should contain concrete results. There is no geographical limitation.


Keywords: cancer screening, participation, social inequality, socio-economic status, health behavior


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

It is generally known there is a so-called social gradient regarding health and health care, meaning that people who are worst off socially and financially also have a worse health and do not get all the health care needed. Unfortunately, this link is also present regarding preventive health care. Several studies found that people with a low(er) socio-economic status (SES) take part less in cancer screening. However, there is a lot of evidence that screening programs for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer lead to a decrease in cause-specific mortality. The lower participation rate of specific subgroups in society is worrisome for several reasons. Firstly, people with a lower SES often also have a higher risk of getting cancer. This is the case for colorectal cancer and cervical cancer. Secondly, this also raises an ethical point: Can we tolerate that subgroups in society have a higher risk of dying from cancer, when it is preventable?

It is therefore important to have access to data on the participation of different societal subgroups in cancer screening; to analyze and interpret these data; to develop interventions to increase the participation rate in those subgroups participating less, and to evaluate these interventions.

Therefore, we are looking to receive manuscripts which describe the results of research on subgroups participating less in cancer screening programs; addressing, but not limited to, the following questions:
• What are the characteristics of subgroups participating less in cancer screening?
• What are the determinants of non-participation?
• What could make these subgroups willing to participate in the future?
• Which interventions have been developed to increase the participation rate in these subgroups?
• Which interventions worked, and which did not?

Although the screening programs on breast, cervical and colorectal cancer are generally the most widespread and considered as effective and efficient, we also welcome studies on other cancer screening programs.

Given the complex nature and comprehensiveness of the topic, it is obvious that a variety of research methods will be used. This means that studies using quantitative as well as studies using qualitative research methods are welcomed. We welcome all article types, including Systematic Reviews, Reviews and results of pilot programs can be accepted; however, the manuscripts should contain concrete results. There is no geographical limitation.


Keywords: cancer screening, participation, social inequality, socio-economic status, health behavior


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

25 September 2020 Abstract
31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

25 September 2020 Abstract
31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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