Research Topic

Probiotics in Children Health

About this Research Topic

Current evidence strongly supports the link between the activity and composition of the gut microbiota and human health. The gut microbiota composition has an impact on the regulation of several systems, especially neural, immune, and gastrointestinal systems. The gut microbiota composition is altered in many diseases, such as disorders of the gut-brain axis, immune and gastrointestinal disorders, and allergic diseases. The composition of gut microbiota is involved in the development of gastrointestinal functions, particularly in the gut-brain axis, and participates in emitting and receiving signals to and from the brain. Therefore, through changes in the microbiota, bidirectional relations between gut and brain are modified, thus influencing the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disorders.

Dr. Eli Metchnikoff, in 1908, opened the era of probiotics, now defined as “Live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host” (FAO/WHO 2001). Probiotics have a crucial role in the maturation and health of the intestinal tract. The administration of probiotics can potentially modulate the gut microbiota and subsequently play a role in the prevention or treatment of several diseases, including conditions occurring during pregnancy.

This Research Topic aims to collect new research about any probiotic therapy relevant to child health. A new interesting field concerns the effects of probiotics supplementation on neurocognitive development. Very recent studies demonstrated that antibiotics administration in the first six months of life determines a subsequent neurocognitive impairment. Also, this is a risk factor for developing functional gastrointestinal disorders. Another field of interest is the so-called “targeted” therapy, with the development of disease-specific products. We are interested in original research, reviews, case reports.

This Research Topic aims to provide evidence-based answers to some of the most relevant questions currently open for the potential use of probiotics in children: necrotizing enterocolitis, functional gastrointestinal disorders, food allergy, celiac disease, liver disease, acute diarrhea, Clostridiodes difficile infections, recurrent respiratory infections, autism, neurocognitive impairment, dermatological problems, and urinary tract infections.


Keywords: probiotics, children, healthy, microbiota, new research


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Current evidence strongly supports the link between the activity and composition of the gut microbiota and human health. The gut microbiota composition has an impact on the regulation of several systems, especially neural, immune, and gastrointestinal systems. The gut microbiota composition is altered in many diseases, such as disorders of the gut-brain axis, immune and gastrointestinal disorders, and allergic diseases. The composition of gut microbiota is involved in the development of gastrointestinal functions, particularly in the gut-brain axis, and participates in emitting and receiving signals to and from the brain. Therefore, through changes in the microbiota, bidirectional relations between gut and brain are modified, thus influencing the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disorders.

Dr. Eli Metchnikoff, in 1908, opened the era of probiotics, now defined as “Live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host” (FAO/WHO 2001). Probiotics have a crucial role in the maturation and health of the intestinal tract. The administration of probiotics can potentially modulate the gut microbiota and subsequently play a role in the prevention or treatment of several diseases, including conditions occurring during pregnancy.

This Research Topic aims to collect new research about any probiotic therapy relevant to child health. A new interesting field concerns the effects of probiotics supplementation on neurocognitive development. Very recent studies demonstrated that antibiotics administration in the first six months of life determines a subsequent neurocognitive impairment. Also, this is a risk factor for developing functional gastrointestinal disorders. Another field of interest is the so-called “targeted” therapy, with the development of disease-specific products. We are interested in original research, reviews, case reports.

This Research Topic aims to provide evidence-based answers to some of the most relevant questions currently open for the potential use of probiotics in children: necrotizing enterocolitis, functional gastrointestinal disorders, food allergy, celiac disease, liver disease, acute diarrhea, Clostridiodes difficile infections, recurrent respiratory infections, autism, neurocognitive impairment, dermatological problems, and urinary tract infections.


Keywords: probiotics, children, healthy, microbiota, new research


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

12 October 2020 Abstract
12 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

12 October 2020 Abstract
12 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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