Research Topic

Energy Justice in the Era of Green Transitions

About this Research Topic

Academic research into energy poverty has continued to grow over the past few decades, covering reflections on drivers, measures, lived experiences, and amelioration among others. One common thread is the impacts on lower-income and disadvantaged households, particularly around the issues of equity and justice. In the context of our continued move towards renewable and sustainable energy globally and the worsening effects of climate change, these issues are growing concerns, especially in relation to access to affordable and clean energy (SDG7), and energy efficient features and technologies, where affordability (or lack thereof) is often cited as a growing wedge in the widening gap between the haves and those left behind. This widening gap is noted to transpire into greatly divergent outcomes for different strata of society, ranging from comfort, health and wellbeing, education, employment, social participation to beyond. Some of these impacts may be long lasting and intergenerational.

In this Research Topic, we call for contributions on how the issue of justice is considered and addressed within the context of transitioning to a renewable future. These may include government or industry-led programs that improve disadvantaged communities' access to new, green technologies; grassroots projects born out of necessity; and also the impacts - at the household or broader levels - these technologies are making to individuals and society, just to name a few. Submissions that showcase less often discussed cultural, geographical and political contexts are particularly welcome.

We welcome both conceptual and empirical submissions on themes such as but not limited to:
• Disadvantaged households' access to renewable energy and green technologies
• Household compensatory behaviors, e.g. reduced transport and social mobilities
• Critiques of and reflections on assistance programs and policies
• Principles for and challenges in achieving energy justice
• Intersections of domestic and other energy / energy efficient technology consumptions (e.g. transport)
• Context-specific case studies, especially from the Global South


Keywords: Energy Justice, Green Transitions, Energy Poverty, Equity and Justice, Renewable Energy, Green Technologies, Government Programs, Industry-led Programs, Grassroots


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Academic research into energy poverty has continued to grow over the past few decades, covering reflections on drivers, measures, lived experiences, and amelioration among others. One common thread is the impacts on lower-income and disadvantaged households, particularly around the issues of equity and justice. In the context of our continued move towards renewable and sustainable energy globally and the worsening effects of climate change, these issues are growing concerns, especially in relation to access to affordable and clean energy (SDG7), and energy efficient features and technologies, where affordability (or lack thereof) is often cited as a growing wedge in the widening gap between the haves and those left behind. This widening gap is noted to transpire into greatly divergent outcomes for different strata of society, ranging from comfort, health and wellbeing, education, employment, social participation to beyond. Some of these impacts may be long lasting and intergenerational.

In this Research Topic, we call for contributions on how the issue of justice is considered and addressed within the context of transitioning to a renewable future. These may include government or industry-led programs that improve disadvantaged communities' access to new, green technologies; grassroots projects born out of necessity; and also the impacts - at the household or broader levels - these technologies are making to individuals and society, just to name a few. Submissions that showcase less often discussed cultural, geographical and political contexts are particularly welcome.

We welcome both conceptual and empirical submissions on themes such as but not limited to:
• Disadvantaged households' access to renewable energy and green technologies
• Household compensatory behaviors, e.g. reduced transport and social mobilities
• Critiques of and reflections on assistance programs and policies
• Principles for and challenges in achieving energy justice
• Intersections of domestic and other energy / energy efficient technology consumptions (e.g. transport)
• Context-specific case studies, especially from the Global South


Keywords: Energy Justice, Green Transitions, Energy Poverty, Equity and Justice, Renewable Energy, Green Technologies, Government Programs, Industry-led Programs, Grassroots


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

21 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

21 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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