Research Topic

Psychiatric Comorbidities in Children and Adolescents with ASD and in Typically Developing Children

About this Research Topic

Atypical development as part of ASD has been examined by numerous researchers and usually compared to typical development of children and adolescents. A typically developing child acquires specific skills and behaviours according to a predictable rate and sequence, i.e. developmental milestones, whereas atypically developing children miss or fail to meet anticipated milestones. Developmental trajectories differ from one group to another, but adverse child experiences have developmental impact on both typical as well as on atypical development and can contribute to comorbidities in both groups of children across the life span. Comorbidities in children with ASD often have a significant impact on their functioning. They can exacerbate existing autism symptoms and make treatment less successful, and can give rise to or make worse other comorbidities in an individual. An extensive research body on the impact of adverse child experiences on comorbidities (motor, emotional, cognitive and social) in children with typical development has been performed, but there is a significant lack of such research in children with ASD.

The goal of this Research Topic is to examine comorbidity, in relation to comorbid psychiatric disorders in infants, children, adolescents and young adults across the lifespan. We welcome contributions shedding light on new paradigms, approaches and data from basic research, as well as clinical and intervention studies in developmental psychopathology, child and adolescent psychiatry, neuroscience, and clinical psychology. The aim of this Research Topic is to highlight new interdisciplinary research on early life experiences, development and comorbidity among atypically developing individuals.
Topics may include:

• Epidemiological data on comorbidity, in relation to comorbid psychiatric disorders, (anxiety, behavioural and psychotic disorders )in infants, children, adolescents and young adults with ASD, and those that experienced typical development

• Effects of adverse child experiences on development of self-concept in children with ASD

• Effects of COVID-19 pandemic and its preventive measures (such as social distancing, staying home, exposure to electronic devices, anxiety and fear) on development of comorbidities in children with ASD and typically developing children

• Neurobiological and psychological mechanisms underlying developmental processes which contribute to comorbidities in children with ASD

• Innovative methods and instruments designed to screen for comorbid psychopathology (anxiety, behavioural and psychotic disorders) in children with ASD


Keywords: Atypical Development, Typical Development, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Comorbidity, Adverse Child Experiences


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Atypical development as part of ASD has been examined by numerous researchers and usually compared to typical development of children and adolescents. A typically developing child acquires specific skills and behaviours according to a predictable rate and sequence, i.e. developmental milestones, whereas atypically developing children miss or fail to meet anticipated milestones. Developmental trajectories differ from one group to another, but adverse child experiences have developmental impact on both typical as well as on atypical development and can contribute to comorbidities in both groups of children across the life span. Comorbidities in children with ASD often have a significant impact on their functioning. They can exacerbate existing autism symptoms and make treatment less successful, and can give rise to or make worse other comorbidities in an individual. An extensive research body on the impact of adverse child experiences on comorbidities (motor, emotional, cognitive and social) in children with typical development has been performed, but there is a significant lack of such research in children with ASD.

The goal of this Research Topic is to examine comorbidity, in relation to comorbid psychiatric disorders in infants, children, adolescents and young adults across the lifespan. We welcome contributions shedding light on new paradigms, approaches and data from basic research, as well as clinical and intervention studies in developmental psychopathology, child and adolescent psychiatry, neuroscience, and clinical psychology. The aim of this Research Topic is to highlight new interdisciplinary research on early life experiences, development and comorbidity among atypically developing individuals.
Topics may include:

• Epidemiological data on comorbidity, in relation to comorbid psychiatric disorders, (anxiety, behavioural and psychotic disorders )in infants, children, adolescents and young adults with ASD, and those that experienced typical development

• Effects of adverse child experiences on development of self-concept in children with ASD

• Effects of COVID-19 pandemic and its preventive measures (such as social distancing, staying home, exposure to electronic devices, anxiety and fear) on development of comorbidities in children with ASD and typically developing children

• Neurobiological and psychological mechanisms underlying developmental processes which contribute to comorbidities in children with ASD

• Innovative methods and instruments designed to screen for comorbid psychopathology (anxiety, behavioural and psychotic disorders) in children with ASD


Keywords: Atypical Development, Typical Development, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Comorbidity, Adverse Child Experiences


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

26 February 2021 Manuscript
26 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

26 February 2021 Manuscript
26 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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