Research Topic

Neuromechanics of Hip Osteoarthritis

About this Research Topic

Hip osteoarthritis (OA) adversely affects the quality of life of millions of people worldwide and imposes a substantial burden on related healthcare systems. The rate of progression of hip OA is heterogeneous, with some people progressing rapidly to a joint replacement, while others effectively manage their pain and symptoms for decades. While conservative non-drug interventions are recommended for management of hip OA, patients report only small-to-modest improvements in pain, function, and quality of life and no existing non-surgical treatment can alter structural disease progression. However, at present, targets for treatment of hip OA and related conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are not well defined, not personalized, and largely based on evidence from knee OA. A need therefore exists to better understand the factors that cause disease progression, and to develop and test interventions that target these factors.

Disease progression in hip OA is understood to be governed by a complex interaction between mechanical, structural and biological factors. Non-optimal mechanical loading of the joint is believed to play a critical role in disease progression, and mechanical loading is potentially modifiable through a range of approaches including movement retraining. Characterizing the mechanical environment of the hip in hip OA is therefore an important yet challenging task. Studies are required to determine how factors such as muscle activation patterns, skeletal and joint geometry, muscle-tendon morphology and mechanics and movement patterns are altered and interact in hip OA. The extent to which these factors are modifiable and viable targets for slowing progression and improving long term functional outcomes also require further investigation. Use of new and innovative integrated technologies will be integral to such developments.

Subtopics of interest include (but are not limited to):
• Neuromechanical function in people with hip OA and related conditions (e.g., FAI, dysplagia) and/or following total hip replacement
• Interventions to improve motor function in people with hip OA (e.g., movement retraining, therapeutic exercise, biofeedback, assistive devices, surgery)
• Advanced methods in hip biomechanics (e.g., big data, wearable devices, artificial intelligence/machine learning, biofeedback systems, finite element analysis, computational models, medical imaging, image analysis, model personalization, multiscale models)

Laura Diamond is receiving financial support from Stryker Orthopaedics to conduct research in an area unrelated to the Research Topic subject. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Biomechanics, Function, Pain, Symptoms, Treatment, Disease Progression


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Hip osteoarthritis (OA) adversely affects the quality of life of millions of people worldwide and imposes a substantial burden on related healthcare systems. The rate of progression of hip OA is heterogeneous, with some people progressing rapidly to a joint replacement, while others effectively manage their pain and symptoms for decades. While conservative non-drug interventions are recommended for management of hip OA, patients report only small-to-modest improvements in pain, function, and quality of life and no existing non-surgical treatment can alter structural disease progression. However, at present, targets for treatment of hip OA and related conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are not well defined, not personalized, and largely based on evidence from knee OA. A need therefore exists to better understand the factors that cause disease progression, and to develop and test interventions that target these factors.

Disease progression in hip OA is understood to be governed by a complex interaction between mechanical, structural and biological factors. Non-optimal mechanical loading of the joint is believed to play a critical role in disease progression, and mechanical loading is potentially modifiable through a range of approaches including movement retraining. Characterizing the mechanical environment of the hip in hip OA is therefore an important yet challenging task. Studies are required to determine how factors such as muscle activation patterns, skeletal and joint geometry, muscle-tendon morphology and mechanics and movement patterns are altered and interact in hip OA. The extent to which these factors are modifiable and viable targets for slowing progression and improving long term functional outcomes also require further investigation. Use of new and innovative integrated technologies will be integral to such developments.

Subtopics of interest include (but are not limited to):
• Neuromechanical function in people with hip OA and related conditions (e.g., FAI, dysplagia) and/or following total hip replacement
• Interventions to improve motor function in people with hip OA (e.g., movement retraining, therapeutic exercise, biofeedback, assistive devices, surgery)
• Advanced methods in hip biomechanics (e.g., big data, wearable devices, artificial intelligence/machine learning, biofeedback systems, finite element analysis, computational models, medical imaging, image analysis, model personalization, multiscale models)

Laura Diamond is receiving financial support from Stryker Orthopaedics to conduct research in an area unrelated to the Research Topic subject. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Biomechanics, Function, Pain, Symptoms, Treatment, Disease Progression


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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