Research Topic

Vesicular Trafficking in Cell Communication: New Insights in Physiology and Pathology

About this Research Topic

Cells of multicellular organisms communicate with each other to maintain homeostasis or to adapt to stress signals. The communication may occur through several ways; direct cell-cell contact where gap junctions or adherent proteins facilitate signal propagations, cell-matrix interaction by integrin which allow long-range signals such as hormones that are released in the blood stream as well as as proteins (SDF-1, HGF, FGF/RA), nucleotides, lipids, and short peptides to monitor the close environment. In addition, the release of extracellular vesicles that contain a cell-specific cargo of proteins, lipids, and genetic material has added a further layer of complexity in this key biological process. Based on their intracellular origin, extracellular vesicles (EVs) may be broadly classified in microvesicles (MVs), exosomes and apoptotic bodies. Both exosomes and MVs are known to influence intercellular communication processes between cells in close proximity as well as distant cells.

At the single-cell level, cells must regulate their own growth and behavior by translating environmental stimuli into signals that regulate gene expression and function. Vesicles continually bud off from one membrane and fuse with another. This vesicular trafficking flows along highly organized, balanced and directional routes from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) towards the Golgi apparatus and cell surface or to lysosomes known as the biosynthetic-secretory pathway this continues to the plasma membrane to early endosomes which then becomes recycled to the surface to be reused or degraded via the endocytic pathway. Disorders in this finely organized vesicular trafficking in and out of the cells is a hallmark of cancer and in a myriad of disease states.

This Research Topic aims to provide deeper insights into how cellular communication occurs between the compartments through vesicles in both physiological and pathological settings. We encourage the submission of Original Research and Reviews articles dissecting the role of vesicular trafficking in mammalian homeostasis and disease. Areas to be covered may include, but are not limited to:

• Trafficking machinery and regulators (microtubules and microtubule associated proteins, Rab-GTPases, PI3Ks, tethering factors and SNAREs)
• Signaling
• The role of oxidative stress and metabolism
• Autophagy
• RNA and organelle transport
• Alteration of vesicular trafficking in disease
• Methods: How to study vesicular trafficking


Keywords: Vesicular Trafficking, Organelle transport, Membrane Trafficking


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cells of multicellular organisms communicate with each other to maintain homeostasis or to adapt to stress signals. The communication may occur through several ways; direct cell-cell contact where gap junctions or adherent proteins facilitate signal propagations, cell-matrix interaction by integrin which allow long-range signals such as hormones that are released in the blood stream as well as as proteins (SDF-1, HGF, FGF/RA), nucleotides, lipids, and short peptides to monitor the close environment. In addition, the release of extracellular vesicles that contain a cell-specific cargo of proteins, lipids, and genetic material has added a further layer of complexity in this key biological process. Based on their intracellular origin, extracellular vesicles (EVs) may be broadly classified in microvesicles (MVs), exosomes and apoptotic bodies. Both exosomes and MVs are known to influence intercellular communication processes between cells in close proximity as well as distant cells.

At the single-cell level, cells must regulate their own growth and behavior by translating environmental stimuli into signals that regulate gene expression and function. Vesicles continually bud off from one membrane and fuse with another. This vesicular trafficking flows along highly organized, balanced and directional routes from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) towards the Golgi apparatus and cell surface or to lysosomes known as the biosynthetic-secretory pathway this continues to the plasma membrane to early endosomes which then becomes recycled to the surface to be reused or degraded via the endocytic pathway. Disorders in this finely organized vesicular trafficking in and out of the cells is a hallmark of cancer and in a myriad of disease states.

This Research Topic aims to provide deeper insights into how cellular communication occurs between the compartments through vesicles in both physiological and pathological settings. We encourage the submission of Original Research and Reviews articles dissecting the role of vesicular trafficking in mammalian homeostasis and disease. Areas to be covered may include, but are not limited to:

• Trafficking machinery and regulators (microtubules and microtubule associated proteins, Rab-GTPases, PI3Ks, tethering factors and SNAREs)
• Signaling
• The role of oxidative stress and metabolism
• Autophagy
• RNA and organelle transport
• Alteration of vesicular trafficking in disease
• Methods: How to study vesicular trafficking


Keywords: Vesicular Trafficking, Organelle transport, Membrane Trafficking


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

03 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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